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I swear, it’s almost comical at this point…

Forums General Melanoma Community I swear, it’s almost comical at this point…

  • Post
    shellebrownies
    Participant

      Don came home from Mass. General on Thursday afternoon after 8 days in the hospital. He finally had his pain managed properly, thank goodness, albeit with a slew of meds to take (whatever works…). We were told that we needed to keep a special eye out for fevers in the coming week while Don's white blood cell counts were low from the Chemo. 

      When the nurse was taking out his IV line, we noticed the area was pink and swollen. She gave Don a heating pack for the road and said it should be fine after that.

      It wasn't.

      Don came home from Mass. General on Thursday afternoon after 8 days in the hospital. He finally had his pain managed properly, thank goodness, albeit with a slew of meds to take (whatever works…). We were told that we needed to keep a special eye out for fevers in the coming week while Don's white blood cell counts were low from the Chemo. 

      When the nurse was taking out his IV line, we noticed the area was pink and swollen. She gave Don a heating pack for the road and said it should be fine after that.

      It wasn't.

      The next afternoon, Don was sporting a temp between 101.7 and 102.3. He was home a whole 24 hours. I called Ellen, Dr. Lawrence's nurse, who told us to go to our local ER for evaluation (Dr. L. is in Chicago for the conference). They got him on a broad spectrum antibiotic right away and admitted him (Should I tell you guys about the hissy I threw when I discovered they were going to put my immuno-compromised husband in a shared room? Or the fit I had on his nurse about making sure he got his medicines on time? She took a half hour just to find us after we got to his new private room, 20 more minutes to locate a bag of saline to hang, and another 20 minutes to get him 2 Tylenol for his fever…I am NOT exaggerating…).

      We heard from the doctor from their Infectious Disease department today that Don has a Staph infection, quite possibly from the IV site. We find out tomorrow whether it's MRSA or not. 

      Yes, really. I kid you not.

      Now they will keep him for at least a couple more days (several more days if it's MRSA) and he will probably have to have IV antibiotics daily for a couple weeks after that at home. 

      Un-frickin-believable.

      Honestly, how sad is it when I tell you that I was relieved to hear it was only a Staph infection? I mean, with our luck, I was just waiting to hear it was the plague or smallpox or some such thing that hardly anyone gets anymore…

       

      Michelle, wife of Don, Stage IV

    Viewing 17 reply threads
    • Replies
        FormerCaregiver
        Participant

          It is encouraging to read that they have Don's pain managed properly. However, an
          infection like this should never have happened. It sounds like someone was careless and
          didn't make sure that things were absolutely sterile. The area where the IV was inserted
          should not have been pink and swollen, as these are signs of infection.

          As you know, a raised temp while on chemo is not good. However, it is a relief that you
          received the correct advice and got him to ER quickly. Unfortunately, staph or MRSA
          infections can both be difficult to deal with.

          I agree with you that the situation is unbelievable!!

          Take care

          Frank from Australia

            shellebrownies
            Participant

              Thanks, Frank. It seems obvious that the infection started in the hospital, and it is frustrating that the nurse didn't take a better look at it before sending us home. His poor arm looks like a pin cushion as it is because he has lymphedema in the other arm, so they can't use it for IVs. 

              He does seem to be responding to the anitbiotics they are giving him, so that at least is good news. And, miraculously, his spirits are still good, even after yet another setback. I don't know how he does it, but I'm awfully glad he does! smiley

              Michelle

              shellebrownies
              Participant

                Thanks, Frank. It seems obvious that the infection started in the hospital, and it is frustrating that the nurse didn't take a better look at it before sending us home. His poor arm looks like a pin cushion as it is because he has lymphedema in the other arm, so they can't use it for IVs. 

                He does seem to be responding to the anitbiotics they are giving him, so that at least is good news. And, miraculously, his spirits are still good, even after yet another setback. I don't know how he does it, but I'm awfully glad he does! smiley

                Michelle

              FormerCaregiver
              Participant

                It is encouraging to read that they have Don's pain managed properly. However, an
                infection like this should never have happened. It sounds like someone was careless and
                didn't make sure that things were absolutely sterile. The area where the IV was inserted
                should not have been pink and swollen, as these are signs of infection.

                As you know, a raised temp while on chemo is not good. However, it is a relief that you
                received the correct advice and got him to ER quickly. Unfortunately, staph or MRSA
                infections can both be difficult to deal with.

                I agree with you that the situation is unbelievable!!

                Take care

                Frank from Australia

                Carol Taylor
                Participant

                  Oh Michelle!

                  I'm so sorry to read this latest! I can only imagine how frazzled, frustrated, and POed you are now. And poor Don must be absolutely worn out (as well as yourself). Is this the place to say "If things can't get any worde, they can only get better"?

                  One thing: It might be a good idea to have your pharmacist look at a complete list of Don's meds and add to that list what they're giving him in the hosp if there are any additions. You want to make very sure there are no further complications with meds that are incompatible…drs don't know that stuff.

                  Michelle, if you don't have time for that, send me a list and I'll have my husband look at it and get back to you. OK?

                  Continued prayers for you two, you need a break and you need some good news! He is so fortunate to have you advocating for him and by his side!

                  Lord, In Your mercy, Don and Michelle need Your divine intervention on their behalf. Help in this time of trouble and hope and calm in this storm. Hold them both and open doors for Don, and please, tend to this infection. Give them strength, stamina, and perseverence. Thank You God, Amen.

                  Carol Taylor
                  Participant

                    Oh Michelle!

                    I'm so sorry to read this latest! I can only imagine how frazzled, frustrated, and POed you are now. And poor Don must be absolutely worn out (as well as yourself). Is this the place to say "If things can't get any worde, they can only get better"?

                    One thing: It might be a good idea to have your pharmacist look at a complete list of Don's meds and add to that list what they're giving him in the hosp if there are any additions. You want to make very sure there are no further complications with meds that are incompatible…drs don't know that stuff.

                    Michelle, if you don't have time for that, send me a list and I'll have my husband look at it and get back to you. OK?

                    Continued prayers for you two, you need a break and you need some good news! He is so fortunate to have you advocating for him and by his side!

                    Lord, In Your mercy, Don and Michelle need Your divine intervention on their behalf. Help in this time of trouble and hope and calm in this storm. Hold them both and open doors for Don, and please, tend to this infection. Give them strength, stamina, and perseverence. Thank You God, Amen.

                      shellebrownies
                      Participant

                        Carol, from your mouth to God's ears! Getting better would be fantastic right about now. Don's spirits are overall still doing quite well; he's certainly a fighter, no question about it!

                        His current meds run like this:

                        For pain: 10mg Methadone 3xday. This is his long-acting dose. 8-12mg Dilaudid every 3 hours as needed for breakthrough pain. So far, he hasn't needed very much of this; his Methadone has it pretty well covered most of the time.

                        Ritalin 5mg at 8am and noon to counteract the fatigue and fuzzy-headed feeling caused by the pain meds.

                        Stool softeners/laxatives: Miralax 17gm 2xday; Senna 8.6 mg 2 tab 2xday; Colace 100mg 2xday.

                        Anti-Nausea: Compazine 10mg every 6 hours. 

                        Reglan 10mg before meals and at bedtime as needed for anti-spasmotic med. (Don was having issues with hiccups that wouldn't go away)

                        Ativan .5-1mg every 3 hours as needed for anxiety or anticipatory nausea/vomiting (has used almost not at all)

                         

                        Thanks for the prayers. I just wish I felt that He was listening!

                        Michelle

                        shellebrownies
                        Participant

                          Carol, from your mouth to God's ears! Getting better would be fantastic right about now. Don's spirits are overall still doing quite well; he's certainly a fighter, no question about it!

                          His current meds run like this:

                          For pain: 10mg Methadone 3xday. This is his long-acting dose. 8-12mg Dilaudid every 3 hours as needed for breakthrough pain. So far, he hasn't needed very much of this; his Methadone has it pretty well covered most of the time.

                          Ritalin 5mg at 8am and noon to counteract the fatigue and fuzzy-headed feeling caused by the pain meds.

                          Stool softeners/laxatives: Miralax 17gm 2xday; Senna 8.6 mg 2 tab 2xday; Colace 100mg 2xday.

                          Anti-Nausea: Compazine 10mg every 6 hours. 

                          Reglan 10mg before meals and at bedtime as needed for anti-spasmotic med. (Don was having issues with hiccups that wouldn't go away)

                          Ativan .5-1mg every 3 hours as needed for anxiety or anticipatory nausea/vomiting (has used almost not at all)

                           

                          Thanks for the prayers. I just wish I felt that He was listening!

                          Michelle

                          Carol Taylor
                          Participant

                            Michelle,

                            I forwarded that list to my husband, he's at the store now so when I hear from him I'll get right back to you.

                            I'm putting together my bulletin for this coming Sunday and had already found this prayer for Pentcoste Sunday and when I read what you wrote, I said this is perfect for you. So, this isn't one I wrote, but comes from Sacredise.

                            God of amazing love and unexpected grace,

                            Open our eyes that we may see You

                                 especially in those times when we feel abandoned by You;

                            Forgive us that we so easily allow circumstance to blind us

                                 to Your Presence.

                            Touch our lives that we may know You

                                 especially in those times when we feel unable to cope;

                            Forgive us that we too frequently mistrust Your power.

                            Fill our hearts that we may become like You

                                 especially when Your message needs to be heard;

                            Forgive us that we forget who we are: children of God with Your Spirit in us. Amen.

                            Hope that helps. Lord, in Your mercy, I know You haven't abandoned Don and Michelle and I know You hear our prayers and that You're working in ways we can't see or understand. The problem is, Lord, they don't feel that and that's what matters. Please Lord, somehow, let them know You're there and for them. Thank You. Amen.

                            Grace and peace to you both,

                            Carol

                            Carol Taylor
                            Participant

                              Michelle,

                              I forwarded that list to my husband, he's at the store now so when I hear from him I'll get right back to you.

                              I'm putting together my bulletin for this coming Sunday and had already found this prayer for Pentcoste Sunday and when I read what you wrote, I said this is perfect for you. So, this isn't one I wrote, but comes from Sacredise.

                              God of amazing love and unexpected grace,

                              Open our eyes that we may see You

                                   especially in those times when we feel abandoned by You;

                              Forgive us that we so easily allow circumstance to blind us

                                   to Your Presence.

                              Touch our lives that we may know You

                                   especially in those times when we feel unable to cope;

                              Forgive us that we too frequently mistrust Your power.

                              Fill our hearts that we may become like You

                                   especially when Your message needs to be heard;

                              Forgive us that we forget who we are: children of God with Your Spirit in us. Amen.

                              Hope that helps. Lord, in Your mercy, I know You haven't abandoned Don and Michelle and I know You hear our prayers and that You're working in ways we can't see or understand. The problem is, Lord, they don't feel that and that's what matters. Please Lord, somehow, let them know You're there and for them. Thank You. Amen.

                              Grace and peace to you both,

                              Carol

                              Carol Taylor
                              Participant

                                Michelle,

                                Mitch has looked over Don's meds and recommends stopping the prochlorperazine because he doesn't need that and the reglan.

                                You can pull up these links and print out for your doctor:

                                This is Don's meds with prochlorperazine:

                                http://www.drugs.com/interactions-check.php?drug_list=1488-0,1578-0,1606-0,1612-0,1946-0,1294-768

                                This is the interactions without prochlorperazine:

                                http://www.drugs.com/interactions-check.php?drug_list=1488-0,1578-0,1606-0,1612-0,1294-768

                                You can see the difference.

                                Hope this helps.

                                Grace and peace,

                                Carol

                                Carol Taylor
                                Participant

                                  Michelle,

                                  Mitch has looked over Don's meds and recommends stopping the prochlorperazine because he doesn't need that and the reglan.

                                  You can pull up these links and print out for your doctor:

                                  This is Don's meds with prochlorperazine:

                                  http://www.drugs.com/interactions-check.php?drug_list=1488-0,1578-0,1606-0,1612-0,1946-0,1294-768

                                  This is the interactions without prochlorperazine:

                                  http://www.drugs.com/interactions-check.php?drug_list=1488-0,1578-0,1606-0,1612-0,1294-768

                                  You can see the difference.

                                  Hope this helps.

                                  Grace and peace,

                                  Carol

                                debandmike
                                Participant

                                  So sorry you had to go through such an ordeal at the hospital. It seems most experiences at hospitals are either wonderful or just the opposite. I know being a caregiver can be very emotionally tiring at times because I am one myself. Try to take care of yourself too. I am working on doing that myself. I am here for support if you would ever like to talk or share your feelings.

                                  Take care and best wishes to you and your husband,

                                  Debby

                                  debandmike
                                  Participant

                                    So sorry you had to go through such an ordeal at the hospital. It seems most experiences at hospitals are either wonderful or just the opposite. I know being a caregiver can be very emotionally tiring at times because I am one myself. Try to take care of yourself too. I am working on doing that myself. I am here for support if you would ever like to talk or share your feelings.

                                    Take care and best wishes to you and your husband,

                                    Debby

                                      shellebrownies
                                      Participant

                                        Debby,

                                        Except for the Staph infection thing, Don's care at MGH was really superb. I suppose that's why its so disappointing that this has happened.

                                        I am trying to hang in there. If nothing else, his being back in the hospital gives me more time to clean the house! (Sorry, gotta make jokes…)

                                        I force myself to eat three meals and at least 2 of them good meals. I don't have time for much else, though, so I've actually lost some weight throughout this ordeal (which is a good thing; I'm overweight).

                                        Thanks for the offer. You know the same goes for me for you, right? smiley

                                        Michelle

                                        shellebrownies
                                        Participant

                                          Debby,

                                          Except for the Staph infection thing, Don's care at MGH was really superb. I suppose that's why its so disappointing that this has happened.

                                          I am trying to hang in there. If nothing else, his being back in the hospital gives me more time to clean the house! (Sorry, gotta make jokes…)

                                          I force myself to eat three meals and at least 2 of them good meals. I don't have time for much else, though, so I've actually lost some weight throughout this ordeal (which is a good thing; I'm overweight).

                                          Thanks for the offer. You know the same goes for me for you, right? smiley

                                          Michelle

                                        nicoli
                                        Participant

                                          Good for you!!! You saw a wrong (several) and you fixed it. This is just what Don needs. Your anger and advocacy will insure Don lives longer.

                                          The first word out of my mouth when I was diagnosed with "&hit". This from someone who normally doesn't cuss. When I apologised to the doctor for my language, he said he took that as a sign that I am a fighter and anger would help my fight.

                                          Infections are rampant in most hospitals. But you found it and did something about it immediately. We hope and pray that the infection is staph and the antibiotics work quickly.

                                          Nicki, Stage 3b

                                          nicoli
                                          Participant

                                            Good for you!!! You saw a wrong (several) and you fixed it. This is just what Don needs. Your anger and advocacy will insure Don lives longer.

                                            The first word out of my mouth when I was diagnosed with "&hit". This from someone who normally doesn't cuss. When I apologised to the doctor for my language, he said he took that as a sign that I am a fighter and anger would help my fight.

                                            Infections are rampant in most hospitals. But you found it and did something about it immediately. We hope and pray that the infection is staph and the antibiotics work quickly.

                                            Nicki, Stage 3b

                                              shellebrownies
                                              Participant

                                                Thanks, Nicki. I do feel fortunate that it was caught relatively quickly and that he does seem to be responding to treatment. I am still holding out hope that it isn't MRSA, but seeing as he contracted it in the hospital, I do think it a likely scenario. 

                                                Don doesn't get as "angry" as I do, but he does seem to have a quiet determination that keeps him going. When we didn't get into the medical trial and was offerred to do the Chemo, it wasn't even a question for him. He knew he wasn't going to stop fighting.

                                                I just hope they get a handle on this soon and that Don's white blood cell counts come back up.

                                                Michelle 

                                                shellebrownies
                                                Participant

                                                  Thanks, Nicki. I do feel fortunate that it was caught relatively quickly and that he does seem to be responding to treatment. I am still holding out hope that it isn't MRSA, but seeing as he contracted it in the hospital, I do think it a likely scenario. 

                                                  Don doesn't get as "angry" as I do, but he does seem to have a quiet determination that keeps him going. When we didn't get into the medical trial and was offerred to do the Chemo, it wasn't even a question for him. He knew he wasn't going to stop fighting.

                                                  I just hope they get a handle on this soon and that Don's white blood cell counts come back up.

                                                  Michelle 

                                                MichaelFL
                                                Participant

                                                  Forgive me in advance, I may have missed some of your posts. I did read your profile though.

                                                  Was Don ever accepted into Dana-Farber? What about the BRAF test?

                                                  Concerning the Staph: Studies have shown that  it survived on polyester hospital curtains for just under three months, so it is a very tough little monster. People who are otherwise healthy typically do not usually become severely ill from staph infections, but since Don has a weakened immune systems due to chemo, he is at higher risk.

                                                  Sounds like someone at Mass General is not properly washing. Make sure ANYONE THAT TOUCHES OR POKES (or whatever) HIM HAS THEIR HANDS WASHED, and uses a hand sanitizer. Also, avoid sharing personal items such as towels, sheets, razors, combs, clothing etc. Staph infections can spread on objects, as well as from person to person. If you or anyone has a cut or sore, wash your hands, and make sure his towels and linens are washed using detergent and hot water with bleach, and then dried in a hot dryer.

                                                  Thoroughly clean shared items – cellphones, keyboards, pagers – using a 1:100 bleach-water solution.

                                                  Hoping it is not the MSRA variety, but if it is be aware that with the increase of staphylococcal resistance to methicillin, vancomycin (or another glycopeptide antibiotic called teicoplanin) is often a treatment of choice in infections with methicillin-resistant MRSA Recently, however, a few strains of Staphylococcus aureus have even developed some degree of resistance to vancomycin. The vancomycin-resistant strains may be more difficult to treat.

                                                  Michael

                                                  MichaelFL
                                                  Participant

                                                    Forgive me in advance, I may have missed some of your posts. I did read your profile though.

                                                    Was Don ever accepted into Dana-Farber? What about the BRAF test?

                                                    Concerning the Staph: Studies have shown that  it survived on polyester hospital curtains for just under three months, so it is a very tough little monster. People who are otherwise healthy typically do not usually become severely ill from staph infections, but since Don has a weakened immune systems due to chemo, he is at higher risk.

                                                    Sounds like someone at Mass General is not properly washing. Make sure ANYONE THAT TOUCHES OR POKES (or whatever) HIM HAS THEIR HANDS WASHED, and uses a hand sanitizer. Also, avoid sharing personal items such as towels, sheets, razors, combs, clothing etc. Staph infections can spread on objects, as well as from person to person. If you or anyone has a cut or sore, wash your hands, and make sure his towels and linens are washed using detergent and hot water with bleach, and then dried in a hot dryer.

                                                    Thoroughly clean shared items – cellphones, keyboards, pagers – using a 1:100 bleach-water solution.

                                                    Hoping it is not the MSRA variety, but if it is be aware that with the increase of staphylococcal resistance to methicillin, vancomycin (or another glycopeptide antibiotic called teicoplanin) is often a treatment of choice in infections with methicillin-resistant MRSA Recently, however, a few strains of Staphylococcus aureus have even developed some degree of resistance to vancomycin. The vancomycin-resistant strains may be more difficult to treat.

                                                    Michael

                                                      shellebrownies
                                                      Participant

                                                        It's okay, Michael…let me catch you up:

                                                        Don was accepted into Dana Farber, but that didn't turn out to be a good thing in this case. The doctor we got was not very proactive and didn't show any sort of sense of urgency with his case once it became clear that his melanoma was very aggressive. She was more about putting out fires rather than getting ahead of the curve.

                                                        Needless to say, when it became clear that she wasn't getting treatment moving quickly enough, we looked elsewhere for treatment.

                                                        We transferred Don's case to Dr. Don Lawrence at Mass General's Melanoma Center. The experience with them was night and day from what we experienced at Dana Farber. 

                                                        Meanwhile, Don's BRAF result came back positive for the mutation….BUT he didn't end up qualifying because his liver function results were out of range. Instead he opted for Chemo as a hopeful stopgap measure to halt the progression of or push back the melanoma enough for him to qualify for a compassionate use trial for PLX4032 that is supposedly opening in the next few weeks. 

                                                        Sounds like I have got some cleaning to do before they release Don from the hospital. Thanks for the tips!

                                                        Michelle

                                                        shellebrownies
                                                        Participant

                                                          It's okay, Michael…let me catch you up:

                                                          Don was accepted into Dana Farber, but that didn't turn out to be a good thing in this case. The doctor we got was not very proactive and didn't show any sort of sense of urgency with his case once it became clear that his melanoma was very aggressive. She was more about putting out fires rather than getting ahead of the curve.

                                                          Needless to say, when it became clear that she wasn't getting treatment moving quickly enough, we looked elsewhere for treatment.

                                                          We transferred Don's case to Dr. Don Lawrence at Mass General's Melanoma Center. The experience with them was night and day from what we experienced at Dana Farber. 

                                                          Meanwhile, Don's BRAF result came back positive for the mutation….BUT he didn't end up qualifying because his liver function results were out of range. Instead he opted for Chemo as a hopeful stopgap measure to halt the progression of or push back the melanoma enough for him to qualify for a compassionate use trial for PLX4032 that is supposedly opening in the next few weeks. 

                                                          Sounds like I have got some cleaning to do before they release Don from the hospital. Thanks for the tips!

                                                          Michelle

                                                          ockelly
                                                          Participant

                                                            Michelle,

                                                            Ugh!

                                                            As an RN I always tell my patients prior to an IV start or any invasive procedure, that I have just washed my hands or I do so in front of them.  You could certainly tell your caregivers that after this experience you always want them to share that information before touching Don.  Otherwise you stop them and ask.  Completely acceptable and should be welcomed by the staff.

                                                            Also, requesting that the IV therapy team starts and maintains his IV sites while he is inpatient would provide more consistency.  Its all they do… fewer distractions and better technique than the floor nurses (I am not saying this to degrade the floor nurses at all… )

                                                            Is there a plan for Don to get a PICC or central line rather than getting poked.  Sounds like his veins need a rest esp with his lymphedema.

                                                            Keeping both of you in my prayers.

                                                            Kelly

                                                            ockelly
                                                            Participant

                                                              Michelle,

                                                              Ugh!

                                                              As an RN I always tell my patients prior to an IV start or any invasive procedure, that I have just washed my hands or I do so in front of them.  You could certainly tell your caregivers that after this experience you always want them to share that information before touching Don.  Otherwise you stop them and ask.  Completely acceptable and should be welcomed by the staff.

                                                              Also, requesting that the IV therapy team starts and maintains his IV sites while he is inpatient would provide more consistency.  Its all they do… fewer distractions and better technique than the floor nurses (I am not saying this to degrade the floor nurses at all… )

                                                              Is there a plan for Don to get a PICC or central line rather than getting poked.  Sounds like his veins need a rest esp with his lymphedema.

                                                              Keeping both of you in my prayers.

                                                              Kelly

                                                            dian in spokane
                                                            Participant

                                                              Michelle,

                                                              So sorry to hear about this infection. I hope they get it cleared up soon. I'm glad his pain is under control

                                                              Good luck to both of you! Sounds like your plate is pretty full

                                                              dian in spokane
                                                              Participant

                                                                Michelle,

                                                                So sorry to hear about this infection. I hope they get it cleared up soon. I'm glad his pain is under control

                                                                Good luck to both of you! Sounds like your plate is pretty full

                                                                nicoli
                                                                Participant

                                                                  Why not gloves? I distinctly remember my nurse wearing gloves when I had my picc line put in or messed with. I went to a hospital that supposedly has a very low infection rate.

                                                                  Nicki, Stage 3b

                                                                  nicoli
                                                                  Participant

                                                                    Why not gloves? I distinctly remember my nurse wearing gloves when I had my picc line put in or messed with. I went to a hospital that supposedly has a very low infection rate.

                                                                    Nicki, Stage 3b

                                                                      ockelly
                                                                      Participant

                                                                        Always gloves…. but after thorough hand washing   Kelly

                                                                        ockelly
                                                                        Participant

                                                                          Always gloves…. but after thorough hand washing   Kelly

                                                                        Charlie S
                                                                        Participant

                                                                          Dark comedy to be sure.

                                                                          Staph is the dark secret of many medical facilities, though I'm not a conspiracy theorist, staph killed my father, and two other people that I know, and it was uncalled for.

                                                                          That said, Don is going to need a broad spectrum IV antibiotic, the best one I know of right now is Vancomiacin……………….I may not be spelling it right but pronounce it like this if you are hooked on phonics Vanko…….like banko,,,,, MY-a sin.  

                                                                          Vanco is a long term use anti-biotic.  It needs to be IV and takes weeks, not days.

                                                                          Pic, IV lines, and Ports are famous for this.

                                                                          Do NOT let docs say this is a short term problem, because Staph is not, it is a long term problem……………….it CAN be overcome. but certainly not by tylenol.

                                                                          I do not intend or want to scare you, but it is important to address the staph and address it right now.

                                                                          Charlie S

                                                                          Charlie S
                                                                          Participant

                                                                            Dark comedy to be sure.

                                                                            Staph is the dark secret of many medical facilities, though I'm not a conspiracy theorist, staph killed my father, and two other people that I know, and it was uncalled for.

                                                                            That said, Don is going to need a broad spectrum IV antibiotic, the best one I know of right now is Vancomiacin……………….I may not be spelling it right but pronounce it like this if you are hooked on phonics Vanko…….like banko,,,,, MY-a sin.  

                                                                            Vanco is a long term use anti-biotic.  It needs to be IV and takes weeks, not days.

                                                                            Pic, IV lines, and Ports are famous for this.

                                                                            Do NOT let docs say this is a short term problem, because Staph is not, it is a long term problem……………….it CAN be overcome. but certainly not by tylenol.

                                                                            I do not intend or want to scare you, but it is important to address the staph and address it right now.

                                                                            Charlie S

                                                                              boot2aboot
                                                                              Participant
                                                                                Police med staff entering room to was hands with soap 20 seconds then rubber goves and mask……i was tyranical about this while my dad was in hospital
                                                                                boot2aboot
                                                                                Participant
                                                                                  Police med staff entering room to was hands with soap 20 seconds then rubber goves and mask……i was tyranical about this while my dad was in hospital
                                                                                Carol Taylor
                                                                                Participant

                                                                                  Michelle,

                                                                                  How's Don? Been thinking about you two all day and Mitch just asked if you've posted today.

                                                                                  Grace and peace,

                                                                                  Carol

                                                                                    shellebrownies
                                                                                    Participant

                                                                                      UPDATE:

                                                                                      Don is mostly doing well. His Staph infection did not turn out to be MRSA. They had moved him from vancomycin to oxacillin yesterday, but he sprouted a big rash on his side from the oxacillin, so they are putting him back on the vancomycin. (Not to mention I had a cow when I discovered that oxacillin can cause liver damage! Shouldn't this be counterindicative for someone with cancer in his liver?)

                                                                                      He also has been having some issues with his blood pressure fluctuating and they are not sure why. After explaining to the doctor that the Ritalin was a new med for Don and why he was taking it, he agreed to discontinue it, as it certainly could be adding to his issues with his blood pressure. Also, they had only been giving him Reglan in the hospital instead of the Compazine so that's okay, too. They are putting him on some blood pressure medicine (I forget now which medicine, but it was common one) to control  it, with the idea that they will wean him back off it as soon as it restabilizes. His white blood cell counts are slowly starting to rebound.

                                                                                      They are testing his blood daily for traces of the Staph. Once he goes at least 36 hours of clean tests, they will put in a PICC line and send him home. We've been told he will need IV antibiotics administered at home for at least 2 more weeks after that. 

                                                                                      On another note, one of Dr. Lawrence's nurses called me today to check in to see how Don was doing. When I told her that I didn't think Dr. L was back until tomorrow, she said he wasn't, but he had stopped by the office and specifically asked after Don. We go back in to see Dr. Lawrence on Monday, assuming Don is out of the hospital by then, of course.

                                                                                      Healthwise, other than the above mentioned, he is feeling better, has been eating better and has had more energy. We are hoping this might mean good things for the outcome of the Chemo.

                                                                                      Thanks everyone for your replies and encouragement. I usually like to respond personally to each post, but I've been spending a lot more time at the hospital in the last couple days and haven't had much time to do it.

                                                                                      Michelle

                                                                                      shellebrownies
                                                                                      Participant

                                                                                        UPDATE:

                                                                                        Don is mostly doing well. His Staph infection did not turn out to be MRSA. They had moved him from vancomycin to oxacillin yesterday, but he sprouted a big rash on his side from the oxacillin, so they are putting him back on the vancomycin. (Not to mention I had a cow when I discovered that oxacillin can cause liver damage! Shouldn't this be counterindicative for someone with cancer in his liver?)

                                                                                        He also has been having some issues with his blood pressure fluctuating and they are not sure why. After explaining to the doctor that the Ritalin was a new med for Don and why he was taking it, he agreed to discontinue it, as it certainly could be adding to his issues with his blood pressure. Also, they had only been giving him Reglan in the hospital instead of the Compazine so that's okay, too. They are putting him on some blood pressure medicine (I forget now which medicine, but it was common one) to control  it, with the idea that they will wean him back off it as soon as it restabilizes. His white blood cell counts are slowly starting to rebound.

                                                                                        They are testing his blood daily for traces of the Staph. Once he goes at least 36 hours of clean tests, they will put in a PICC line and send him home. We've been told he will need IV antibiotics administered at home for at least 2 more weeks after that. 

                                                                                        On another note, one of Dr. Lawrence's nurses called me today to check in to see how Don was doing. When I told her that I didn't think Dr. L was back until tomorrow, she said he wasn't, but he had stopped by the office and specifically asked after Don. We go back in to see Dr. Lawrence on Monday, assuming Don is out of the hospital by then, of course.

                                                                                        Healthwise, other than the above mentioned, he is feeling better, has been eating better and has had more energy. We are hoping this might mean good things for the outcome of the Chemo.

                                                                                        Thanks everyone for your replies and encouragement. I usually like to respond personally to each post, but I've been spending a lot more time at the hospital in the last couple days and haven't had much time to do it.

                                                                                        Michelle

                                                                                        FormerCaregiver
                                                                                        Participant

                                                                                          Thanks for the update on Don's condition. It is good that they are going to put in a PICC
                                                                                          line, as this makes things a lot easier as far as the chemo goes. It is a relief that he
                                                                                          is feeling better and has more energy.

                                                                                          Please don't forget that you need to look after yourself, because being a caregiver is
                                                                                          stressful and challenging.

                                                                                          Both of you remain in my prayers.

                                                                                          Frank from Australia

                                                                                          FormerCaregiver
                                                                                          Participant

                                                                                            Thanks for the update on Don's condition. It is good that they are going to put in a PICC
                                                                                            line, as this makes things a lot easier as far as the chemo goes. It is a relief that he
                                                                                            is feeling better and has more energy.

                                                                                            Please don't forget that you need to look after yourself, because being a caregiver is
                                                                                            stressful and challenging.

                                                                                            Both of you remain in my prayers.

                                                                                            Frank from Australia

                                                                                          Carol Taylor
                                                                                          Participant

                                                                                            Michelle,

                                                                                            How's Don? Been thinking about you two all day and Mitch just asked if you've posted today.

                                                                                            Grace and peace,

                                                                                            Carol

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