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ct vs pet

Forums General Melanoma Community ct vs pet

  • Post
    momof4boys
    Participant
      I have just completed my 1st 4 doses of ipi a couple of weeks ago and am scheduled for a ct on thurs. This will be my first ct as so far I have only had pet scans and the brain mri. My dr says the trial doesn’t require a pet at this stage and am a little concerned. Should I be? Would a ct show more detail than a pet?
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    • Replies
        kpcollins31
        Participant

          I would not be concerned – a CT should be able to provide a good amount of information… if they see something in the CT that warrants further examination, then they would likely schedule a PET. That is what they did in my case.

          Kevin

           

          kpcollins31
          Participant

            I would not be concerned – a CT should be able to provide a good amount of information… if they see something in the CT that warrants further examination, then they would likely schedule a PET. That is what they did in my case.

            Kevin

             

            kpcollins31
            Participant

              I would not be concerned – a CT should be able to provide a good amount of information… if they see something in the CT that warrants further examination, then they would likely schedule a PET. That is what they did in my case.

              Kevin

               

              Janet Lee
              Participant

                My husband (Stage 4) has had only Ct-Scans and MRI's. He's never had a PET. I've often wondered what the PET offers that a CT doesn't. He has been treated at both Dana Farber and Mass General, and they both use CT scans. So, I guess I wouldn't worry, if I were you. You've got enough other things to concern yourself with. Good luck!

                Janet Lee

                Janet Lee
                Participant

                  My husband (Stage 4) has had only Ct-Scans and MRI's. He's never had a PET. I've often wondered what the PET offers that a CT doesn't. He has been treated at both Dana Farber and Mass General, and they both use CT scans. So, I guess I wouldn't worry, if I were you. You've got enough other things to concern yourself with. Good luck!

                  Janet Lee

                  Janet Lee
                  Participant

                    My husband (Stage 4) has had only Ct-Scans and MRI's. He's never had a PET. I've often wondered what the PET offers that a CT doesn't. He has been treated at both Dana Farber and Mass General, and they both use CT scans. So, I guess I wouldn't worry, if I were you. You've got enough other things to concern yourself with. Good luck!

                    Janet Lee

                    Bubbles
                    Participant

                      I have had both PET scans and CT scans of my body  throughout my melanoma experiences, depending on the preferences of the doc of the moment, and MRI's of my brain. 

                      A PET (Positron Emission Tomography) Scan provides a three-dimensional image of cells in the body that take up the tracer administered IV.  The tracer will be increased, and therefore "light up", in cells with increased metabolism, like cancer.  The brain will always light up because of its continuous high level of activity.  That's why MRI's are better when evaluating that area.  The issue of metabolism is also why physical activity is limited in the 24 hour period prior and a rest period given just before the PET scan.

                      CT (Computerized Tomography) Scans show a detailed version of the X-ray that allows doctors to see the fine detail of the particular area or organ in question.  A PET scan can be used to direct attention to the possible location of disease in the body.  The CT scan focuses on the structure of the area to assess any pathology. 

                      MRI's (Magnetic Reasonance Imaging) uses a magnetic field to produce detailed pictures of body structures.  It is very good at providing detailed pictures of solid organs that are not moving.  That's why it is good in evaluating the brain…but not the heart, lungs, or the intestines.

                      A combination of these studies is usually the best way to provide an accurate evaluation.  Hope that helps. Celeste

                      Bubbles
                      Participant

                        I have had both PET scans and CT scans of my body  throughout my melanoma experiences, depending on the preferences of the doc of the moment, and MRI's of my brain. 

                        A PET (Positron Emission Tomography) Scan provides a three-dimensional image of cells in the body that take up the tracer administered IV.  The tracer will be increased, and therefore "light up", in cells with increased metabolism, like cancer.  The brain will always light up because of its continuous high level of activity.  That's why MRI's are better when evaluating that area.  The issue of metabolism is also why physical activity is limited in the 24 hour period prior and a rest period given just before the PET scan.

                        CT (Computerized Tomography) Scans show a detailed version of the X-ray that allows doctors to see the fine detail of the particular area or organ in question.  A PET scan can be used to direct attention to the possible location of disease in the body.  The CT scan focuses on the structure of the area to assess any pathology. 

                        MRI's (Magnetic Reasonance Imaging) uses a magnetic field to produce detailed pictures of body structures.  It is very good at providing detailed pictures of solid organs that are not moving.  That's why it is good in evaluating the brain…but not the heart, lungs, or the intestines.

                        A combination of these studies is usually the best way to provide an accurate evaluation.  Hope that helps. Celeste

                        Bubbles
                        Participant

                          I have had both PET scans and CT scans of my body  throughout my melanoma experiences, depending on the preferences of the doc of the moment, and MRI's of my brain. 

                          A PET (Positron Emission Tomography) Scan provides a three-dimensional image of cells in the body that take up the tracer administered IV.  The tracer will be increased, and therefore "light up", in cells with increased metabolism, like cancer.  The brain will always light up because of its continuous high level of activity.  That's why MRI's are better when evaluating that area.  The issue of metabolism is also why physical activity is limited in the 24 hour period prior and a rest period given just before the PET scan.

                          CT (Computerized Tomography) Scans show a detailed version of the X-ray that allows doctors to see the fine detail of the particular area or organ in question.  A PET scan can be used to direct attention to the possible location of disease in the body.  The CT scan focuses on the structure of the area to assess any pathology. 

                          MRI's (Magnetic Reasonance Imaging) uses a magnetic field to produce detailed pictures of body structures.  It is very good at providing detailed pictures of solid organs that are not moving.  That's why it is good in evaluating the brain…but not the heart, lungs, or the intestines.

                          A combination of these studies is usually the best way to provide an accurate evaluation.  Hope that helps. Celeste

                            JerryfromFauq
                            Participant

                              The thing I would add to Celeste's good explanation is that the PET scan is well known for both false positives and false neegatives.  A PET is just a good starting point of places to look at nd examine further.  I've only had a couple of PETs in the past s5 years.  have had numerous CT's to track the fine details of the tumors.

                               

                              JerryfromFauq
                              Participant

                                The thing I would add to Celeste's good explanation is that the PET scan is well known for both false positives and false neegatives.  A PET is just a good starting point of places to look at nd examine further.  I've only had a couple of PETs in the past s5 years.  have had numerous CT's to track the fine details of the tumors.

                                 

                                JerryfromFauq
                                Participant

                                  The thing I would add to Celeste's good explanation is that the PET scan is well known for both false positives and false neegatives.  A PET is just a good starting point of places to look at nd examine further.  I've only had a couple of PETs in the past s5 years.  have had numerous CT's to track the fine details of the tumors.

                                   

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