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help with ct scan results

Forums General Melanoma Community help with ct scan results

  • Post
    premedy
    Participant

      Just had a cat scan done with the following results

       A new .4cm nodule in the left lower lobe is noted.  New focal patchy and ground glass opacities in the right lung are noted.

       

      Spleen – Mild splenomegaly is increased measuring 14.2 cm in craniocaudal dimension, previously 12.7cm.

      Abdominal lymph nodes are increased in size and number.  Subcentimeter mesenteric lymph nodes are also increased in size and number

       

      Just had a cat scan done with the following results

       A new .4cm nodule in the left lower lobe is noted.  New focal patchy and ground glass opacities in the right lung are noted.

       

      Spleen – Mild splenomegaly is increased measuring 14.2 cm in craniocaudal dimension, previously 12.7cm.

      Abdominal lymph nodes are increased in size and number.  Subcentimeter mesenteric lymph nodes are also increased in size and number

       

      Has anyone seen anything like this with the lungs.  I've never heard the term patchy ground glass opacities but it doesn't sound good.  Has anyone dealt with enlarged abdominal nodes?

       

      thanks in advance.

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        MichaelFL
        Participant

          Here are two websites I found concerning ground glass opacities:

          (hopefully someone else can help you with the rest of  your CT scan, but perhaps these questions are best left to the doctors)

          Good luck,

          Michael

          From medcyclopaedia:

          Ground-glass attenuation

          (also called ground-glass opacity), a nonspecific term that refers to the radiographic appearance of hazy lung opacity not associated with obscuration of underlying vessels (Fig.1). Although ground-glass opacity is sometimes said to be present on plain radiographs, it is more clearly shown on HRCT. This finding can reflect the presence of minimal thickening of the "septal" or alveolar interstitium, thickening of alveolar walls, or the presence of cells or fluid partially filling the alveolar spaces. Ground-glass opacity has been seen in patients with histological findings of mild or early interstitial inflammation or infiltration.

          Ground-glass opacity is a highly significant finding on HRCT, as it often indicates the presence of an active and potentially treatable process; active disease is present in more than 80% of patients who show this finding. Because of its association with active lung disease, the presence of ground-glass opacity often leads to further diagnostic evaluation, including lung biopsy.

          Because ground-glass opacity can reflect the presence of either fibrosis or inflammation, one should be careful to suggest the presence of an active process only when ground-glass opacity is unassociated with HRCT findings of fibrosis. If ground-glass opacity is seen only in lung regions that also show evidence of fibrosis, such as intralobular interstitial thickening, honeycombing or traction bronchiectasis, it is most likely that this finding reflects fibrosis rather than an active process.

          A large number of diseases can be associated with ground-glass opacity on HRCT. In many, this reflects the presence of similar histological reactions in the early or active stages of disease, with inflammatory exudates involving the alveolar septa and alveolar spaces, although this pattern can be the result of a variety of pathological processes. In most, the disease is patchy in distribution. The most common causes of ground-glass opacity include usual interstitial pneumonia, nonspecific interstitial pneumonitis, desquamative interstitial pneumonia, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, pulmonary oedema and pulmonary haemorrhage, and pneumonias (particularly pneumocystis carinii pneumonia). Less common causes include alveolar proteinosis, acute interstitial pneumonia or other causes of diffuse alveolar damage or the adult respiratory distress syndrome, respiratory bronchiolitis and early radiation pneumonitis.

          Here is another site:http://pathhsw5m54.ucsf.edu/case29/radiology29.html#answer2

          Ground-glass opacity: In CT, particularly high-resolution CT (HRCT), the term "ground-glass" is used if hazy lung opacity does not obscure underlying blood vessels (as opposed to "consolidation" which obscures vessels) . When pulmonary morphologic abnormalities below the resolution of HRCT (at best 0.1 to 0.2 mm are imaged, ground-glass opacity is produced as a result of volume averaging. The presence of ground-glass opacity signifies minimal thickening of the alveolar walls or partial filling of the alveolar air spaces with fluid or cells. Also, small amounts of fluid lying against alveolar walls can give the same appearance as alveolar wall thickening. Leung, et al. studied 22 patients with ground-glass opacity at HRCT. Histology showed primarily interstitial disease in just over 1/2, interstitial and air-space disease in 1/3, and predominantly air space disease in 1/7.

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          MichaelFL
          Participant

            Here are two websites I found concerning ground glass opacities:

            (hopefully someone else can help you with the rest of  your CT scan, but perhaps these questions are best left to the doctors)

            Good luck,

            Michael

            From medcyclopaedia:

            Ground-glass attenuation

            (also called ground-glass opacity), a nonspecific term that refers to the radiographic appearance of hazy lung opacity not associated with obscuration of underlying vessels (Fig.1). Although ground-glass opacity is sometimes said to be present on plain radiographs, it is more clearly shown on HRCT. This finding can reflect the presence of minimal thickening of the "septal" or alveolar interstitium, thickening of alveolar walls, or the presence of cells or fluid partially filling the alveolar spaces. Ground-glass opacity has been seen in patients with histological findings of mild or early interstitial inflammation or infiltration.

            Ground-glass opacity is a highly significant finding on HRCT, as it often indicates the presence of an active and potentially treatable process; active disease is present in more than 80% of patients who show this finding. Because of its association with active lung disease, the presence of ground-glass opacity often leads to further diagnostic evaluation, including lung biopsy.

            Because ground-glass opacity can reflect the presence of either fibrosis or inflammation, one should be careful to suggest the presence of an active process only when ground-glass opacity is unassociated with HRCT findings of fibrosis. If ground-glass opacity is seen only in lung regions that also show evidence of fibrosis, such as intralobular interstitial thickening, honeycombing or traction bronchiectasis, it is most likely that this finding reflects fibrosis rather than an active process.

            A large number of diseases can be associated with ground-glass opacity on HRCT. In many, this reflects the presence of similar histological reactions in the early or active stages of disease, with inflammatory exudates involving the alveolar septa and alveolar spaces, although this pattern can be the result of a variety of pathological processes. In most, the disease is patchy in distribution. The most common causes of ground-glass opacity include usual interstitial pneumonia, nonspecific interstitial pneumonitis, desquamative interstitial pneumonia, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, pulmonary oedema and pulmonary haemorrhage, and pneumonias (particularly pneumocystis carinii pneumonia). Less common causes include alveolar proteinosis, acute interstitial pneumonia or other causes of diffuse alveolar damage or the adult respiratory distress syndrome, respiratory bronchiolitis and early radiation pneumonitis.

            Here is another site:http://pathhsw5m54.ucsf.edu/case29/radiology29.html#answer2

            Ground-glass opacity: In CT, particularly high-resolution CT (HRCT), the term "ground-glass" is used if hazy lung opacity does not obscure underlying blood vessels (as opposed to "consolidation" which obscures vessels) . When pulmonary morphologic abnormalities below the resolution of HRCT (at best 0.1 to 0.2 mm are imaged, ground-glass opacity is produced as a result of volume averaging. The presence of ground-glass opacity signifies minimal thickening of the alveolar walls or partial filling of the alveolar air spaces with fluid or cells. Also, small amounts of fluid lying against alveolar walls can give the same appearance as alveolar wall thickening. Leung, et al. studied 22 patients with ground-glass opacity at HRCT. Histology showed primarily interstitial disease in just over 1/2, interstitial and air-space disease in 1/3, and predominantly air space disease in 1/7.

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