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Trying to figure out ALC??? (Maybe Jimmy B can help :)))))

Forums General Melanoma Community Trying to figure out ALC??? (Maybe Jimmy B can help :)))))

  • Post
    WendyPam
    Participant

      This is my question I have new labs today and I'm trying to figure out my Mom's  ALC to see if we are having any response yet to the Yervoy reindustion.  I hope they gave me the right information.  She had issues last week with the diarrhea and Dr has her on Prednisone 60mg evey morning.  She is still going every morning 2x. We saw the Dr today. (our dr is away until next week saw someone else in the practise) Plans are to move forward with infusion #3 March 13 and keeping her on the steriod.

      This is my question I have new labs today and I'm trying to figure out my Mom's  ALC to see if we are having any response yet to the Yervoy reindustion.  I hope they gave me the right information.  She had issues last week with the diarrhea and Dr has her on Prednisone 60mg evey morning.  She is still going every morning 2x. We saw the Dr today. (our dr is away until next week saw someone else in the practise) Plans are to move forward with infusion #3 March 13 and keeping her on the steriod. I don't know about the taper yet.  Her labs last week  White blood cell count 8.0/ LD 879?

       

      White blood Cell Count   13.6  H                              4.8-10.8 (range)   Last week this number was 8.0

      LD(Lactic Dehydrogenase- serum  744  H            313-618  (range)  Last week this number was 896

      Is this the formula? Did I get the correct labs? Is her number over 2000?

      Absolute Lymphocyte Count = (White Blood Cell Count) x (Lymphocytes %)

       

      Thanks for your input!

       

      Wendy

    Viewing 5 reply threads
    • Replies
        Lisa13
        Participant

          Hi Wendy,

          I'm in Canada, so I think our numbers look different  For examble, my regular ALC is around 1.90 (1900) and when I went on ipi the last time, they went up to 2.85 (2850). It would be good if her ALC was 2000, but you really need to get someone to know exactly what it is.

          I'm hoping the best.

          Lisa

          Lisa13
          Participant

            Hi Wendy,

            I'm in Canada, so I think our numbers look different  For examble, my regular ALC is around 1.90 (1900) and when I went on ipi the last time, they went up to 2.85 (2850). It would be good if her ALC was 2000, but you really need to get someone to know exactly what it is.

            I'm hoping the best.

            Lisa

            Lisa13
            Participant

              Hi Wendy,

              I'm in Canada, so I think our numbers look different  For examble, my regular ALC is around 1.90 (1900) and when I went on ipi the last time, they went up to 2.85 (2850). It would be good if her ALC was 2000, but you really need to get someone to know exactly what it is.

              I'm hoping the best.

              Lisa

              jim Breitfeller
              Participant

                Wendy,

                Absolute Lymphocyte Count

                Now you are ready for the next three letter acronym, ALC (absolute lymphocyte count). It is nothing more than the name implies, the total number of lymphocytes (B-cells plus T-cells) in the sample of your blood.

                Absolute counts are calculated by taking the total white blood cell count and multiplying it by the percent of the specific cell line you are interested in.  That cell line would be lymphocytes.

                If the count increases it is an indication that there is immune response in progress.

                The percentages are derived from 1) a microscopic examination of blood performed manually in which some hundreds of cells (varies by need) are differentiated from each other (the procedure is called a differential or diff) or 2)a machine scored differentiation based on cell patterns.

                 

                Again, reference ranges do vary but granulocytes (polys, segs, neutrophils) are usually 50-70%; lymphocytes 20-40%; monocytes 0-8%; eosinophils 0-2% and basophiles 0-1%. SO, a percentage of 50 % granulocytes in a total white count of 4,000 equals an absolute granulocyte count of 2,000.

                 You are missing what the percentage of lymphocytes in your mother's blood.

                 

                Best regards

                 

                Jimmy B

                jim Breitfeller
                Participant

                  Wendy,

                  Absolute Lymphocyte Count

                  Now you are ready for the next three letter acronym, ALC (absolute lymphocyte count). It is nothing more than the name implies, the total number of lymphocytes (B-cells plus T-cells) in the sample of your blood.

                  Absolute counts are calculated by taking the total white blood cell count and multiplying it by the percent of the specific cell line you are interested in.  That cell line would be lymphocytes.

                  If the count increases it is an indication that there is immune response in progress.

                  The percentages are derived from 1) a microscopic examination of blood performed manually in which some hundreds of cells (varies by need) are differentiated from each other (the procedure is called a differential or diff) or 2)a machine scored differentiation based on cell patterns.

                   

                  Again, reference ranges do vary but granulocytes (polys, segs, neutrophils) are usually 50-70%; lymphocytes 20-40%; monocytes 0-8%; eosinophils 0-2% and basophiles 0-1%. SO, a percentage of 50 % granulocytes in a total white count of 4,000 equals an absolute granulocyte count of 2,000.

                   You are missing what the percentage of lymphocytes in your mother's blood.

                   

                  Best regards

                   

                  Jimmy B

                  jim Breitfeller
                  Participant

                    Wendy,

                    Absolute Lymphocyte Count

                    Now you are ready for the next three letter acronym, ALC (absolute lymphocyte count). It is nothing more than the name implies, the total number of lymphocytes (B-cells plus T-cells) in the sample of your blood.

                    Absolute counts are calculated by taking the total white blood cell count and multiplying it by the percent of the specific cell line you are interested in.  That cell line would be lymphocytes.

                    If the count increases it is an indication that there is immune response in progress.

                    The percentages are derived from 1) a microscopic examination of blood performed manually in which some hundreds of cells (varies by need) are differentiated from each other (the procedure is called a differential or diff) or 2)a machine scored differentiation based on cell patterns.

                     

                    Again, reference ranges do vary but granulocytes (polys, segs, neutrophils) are usually 50-70%; lymphocytes 20-40%; monocytes 0-8%; eosinophils 0-2% and basophiles 0-1%. SO, a percentage of 50 % granulocytes in a total white count of 4,000 equals an absolute granulocyte count of 2,000.

                     You are missing what the percentage of lymphocytes in your mother's blood.

                     

                    Best regards

                     

                    Jimmy B

                Viewing 5 reply threads
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