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Help prepare for husband removal of lymphnodes right side, then right lung upper lobe

Forums General Melanoma Community Help prepare for husband removal of lymphnodes right side, then right lung upper lobe

  • Post
    flvermonter
    Participant

      Hello again,

       

      Hello again,

       

      So my husband's stress test is next tuesday, his lymphnode surgery to remove all on the right side is 6/6 at Moffit, then the lung surgery is 6/20 at Moffit.  He is over the top with stress and I am keeping calm in front of him.   It is so overwhelming for him to go through, but there isn't a real alternative at this point.   Help me understand what to expect, and how to help him prepare.  We started walking today, a little to get his stamina up again, I am guessing low carb, high protein diet would be best.  Please let me know what you know from your experience.

       

      Thanks, Mary

    Viewing 8 reply threads
    • Replies
        vivian
        Participant

          Dear Mary,

          I am not sure how well this will relate to your husband's situation, but I had a complete axillary lymph node dissection in November 2010, only five days after an emergency appendectomy.  The CLND surgery itself was really no big deal, and recovery was fairly painless, once the drain was removed.  I truly felt fine afterwards.  There are lingering nerve and lymphodema issues but nothing debilitating.  In November 2012, I had  VATS removal of one lung met.  Again, this was pretty painless after the chest tube was removed on day 2.  After both surgeries, I was limited as to what I could lift, etc. for about 8 weeks.  Following that, life returned to normal, although one must accept a slightly different normal after any big illness or surgery.  Most people on this forum have had lymph node dissections and other surgeries, but we are here and many of us are NED, even at stage 4.  

          Wishing you and your husband the best,

          Lear

          vivian
          Participant

            Dear Mary,

            I am not sure how well this will relate to your husband's situation, but I had a complete axillary lymph node dissection in November 2010, only five days after an emergency appendectomy.  The CLND surgery itself was really no big deal, and recovery was fairly painless, once the drain was removed.  I truly felt fine afterwards.  There are lingering nerve and lymphodema issues but nothing debilitating.  In November 2012, I had  VATS removal of one lung met.  Again, this was pretty painless after the chest tube was removed on day 2.  After both surgeries, I was limited as to what I could lift, etc. for about 8 weeks.  Following that, life returned to normal, although one must accept a slightly different normal after any big illness or surgery.  Most people on this forum have had lymph node dissections and other surgeries, but we are here and many of us are NED, even at stage 4.  

            Wishing you and your husband the best,

            Lear

            vivian
            Participant

              Dear Mary,

              I am not sure how well this will relate to your husband's situation, but I had a complete axillary lymph node dissection in November 2010, only five days after an emergency appendectomy.  The CLND surgery itself was really no big deal, and recovery was fairly painless, once the drain was removed.  I truly felt fine afterwards.  There are lingering nerve and lymphodema issues but nothing debilitating.  In November 2012, I had  VATS removal of one lung met.  Again, this was pretty painless after the chest tube was removed on day 2.  After both surgeries, I was limited as to what I could lift, etc. for about 8 weeks.  Following that, life returned to normal, although one must accept a slightly different normal after any big illness or surgery.  Most people on this forum have had lymph node dissections and other surgeries, but we are here and many of us are NED, even at stage 4.  

              Wishing you and your husband the best,

              Lear

              Cindy VT
              Participant

                I hope all goes well for him.  I had a tumor and lympnode removal two different surgeries.  The first one wasn't bad but the second left me nerve problems.  I believe I had 25 lymph nodes taken out.  This was in 2006.   For the second one I needed to go to physical therapy because I could not move my arm past my waist.  6 week of PT really was very good.

                Best of luck,

                Cindy VT

                Cindy VT
                Participant

                  I hope all goes well for him.  I had a tumor and lympnode removal two different surgeries.  The first one wasn't bad but the second left me nerve problems.  I believe I had 25 lymph nodes taken out.  This was in 2006.   For the second one I needed to go to physical therapy because I could not move my arm past my waist.  6 week of PT really was very good.

                  Best of luck,

                  Cindy VT

                    flvermonter
                    Participant

                      Hi Cindy,

                       

                      Thanks for information and I know I thought it was weird that the surgeons have no way of knowing how many nodes they remove until the pathologist test them.  I know Dr Zager said it could be 24 or 42, depends.

                      My husband has had PT for his right shoulder off and on over the years, but hoping he won't need it after the surgery.  Thanks, Mary

                      flvermonter
                      Participant

                        Hi Cindy,

                         

                        Thanks for information and I know I thought it was weird that the surgeons have no way of knowing how many nodes they remove until the pathologist test them.  I know Dr Zager said it could be 24 or 42, depends.

                        My husband has had PT for his right shoulder off and on over the years, but hoping he won't need it after the surgery.  Thanks, Mary

                        flvermonter
                        Participant

                          Hi Cindy,

                           

                          Thanks for information and I know I thought it was weird that the surgeons have no way of knowing how many nodes they remove until the pathologist test them.  I know Dr Zager said it could be 24 or 42, depends.

                          My husband has had PT for his right shoulder off and on over the years, but hoping he won't need it after the surgery.  Thanks, Mary

                        Cindy VT
                        Participant

                          I hope all goes well for him.  I had a tumor and lympnode removal two different surgeries.  The first one wasn't bad but the second left me nerve problems.  I believe I had 25 lymph nodes taken out.  This was in 2006.   For the second one I needed to go to physical therapy because I could not move my arm past my waist.  6 week of PT really was very good.

                          Best of luck,

                          Cindy VT

                          Jim M.
                          Participant

                            Hi,

                              I had a CLND to my right axillary in 2007 at Moffitt also. My surgeon was Dr. Jonathan Zager. He's a wonderful surgeon. Before your husband gets discharged he should be given literature on lymphedema. They will tell him never to get an iv, blood draw or blood pressure taken on that side (I'm assuming the CLND is at his right armpit or axillary)? LISTEN to them when they tell him this. If he is in a future clinical trial/ treatment and the protocol requires an iv in his right arm, REFUSE IT. Tell them to give him alternatives (sticking him somewhere else) to achieve their purposes. IF he allows someone to stick him on the right side he will be at even greater risk for getting lymphedema. The above happened to me and I have lymphedema, although it's manageable.

                               They will also give him a booklet of exercises to get his range of motion back. It is not a quick process. They will also tell you how to use the drain. It was helpful for me to have my wife assist me with this, although it can be done alone. I was able to go to work with the drain. I wore button down shirts and put the end of the drain in my shirt pocket.

                            I can't comment on the lung surgery as I haven't had it. Hope this helps. God bless.

                             Jim M.

                              

                            Jim M.
                            Participant

                              Hi,

                                I had a CLND to my right axillary in 2007 at Moffitt also. My surgeon was Dr. Jonathan Zager. He's a wonderful surgeon. Before your husband gets discharged he should be given literature on lymphedema. They will tell him never to get an iv, blood draw or blood pressure taken on that side (I'm assuming the CLND is at his right armpit or axillary)? LISTEN to them when they tell him this. If he is in a future clinical trial/ treatment and the protocol requires an iv in his right arm, REFUSE IT. Tell them to give him alternatives (sticking him somewhere else) to achieve their purposes. IF he allows someone to stick him on the right side he will be at even greater risk for getting lymphedema. The above happened to me and I have lymphedema, although it's manageable.

                                 They will also give him a booklet of exercises to get his range of motion back. It is not a quick process. They will also tell you how to use the drain. It was helpful for me to have my wife assist me with this, although it can be done alone. I was able to go to work with the drain. I wore button down shirts and put the end of the drain in my shirt pocket.

                              I can't comment on the lung surgery as I haven't had it. Hope this helps. God bless.

                               Jim M.

                                

                              Jim M.
                              Participant

                                Hi,

                                  I had a CLND to my right axillary in 2007 at Moffitt also. My surgeon was Dr. Jonathan Zager. He's a wonderful surgeon. Before your husband gets discharged he should be given literature on lymphedema. They will tell him never to get an iv, blood draw or blood pressure taken on that side (I'm assuming the CLND is at his right armpit or axillary)? LISTEN to them when they tell him this. If he is in a future clinical trial/ treatment and the protocol requires an iv in his right arm, REFUSE IT. Tell them to give him alternatives (sticking him somewhere else) to achieve their purposes. IF he allows someone to stick him on the right side he will be at even greater risk for getting lymphedema. The above happened to me and I have lymphedema, although it's manageable.

                                   They will also give him a booklet of exercises to get his range of motion back. It is not a quick process. They will also tell you how to use the drain. It was helpful for me to have my wife assist me with this, although it can be done alone. I was able to go to work with the drain. I wore button down shirts and put the end of the drain in my shirt pocket.

                                I can't comment on the lung surgery as I haven't had it. Hope this helps. God bless.

                                 Jim M.

                                  

                                  flvermonter
                                  Participant

                                    Hi Jim,

                                    Thanks so much for the information and it does help.  Dr Tolazo has ordered a stress test for my husband and he is taking that today.  We should know later today, tomorrow if there are any problems.  We really like Dr Zager, he has been straight and very compassionate with us through this process.

                                    I will definitly heed the words from the hospital and watch out for lymphedema. Hope you had a good holiday weekend and thanks again.  Regards, Mary

                                    Jim M.
                                    Participant

                                      Hi Mary,

                                       Another thing I thought of. After I healed from the CLND my doctor, Jeffrey Weber, recommended I get radiation to the surgery area. Doing this he said would reduce the possibility of a local recurrence from 60% to 10%. Quite an  impressive difference. I went ahead with the radiation. I had a preliminary consultation with Dr. Berg in Tampa. Since we live almost 3 hours from Tampa I chose to find a local radiation oncologist. The trade off is with surgery alone the risk of getting lymphedema is 20%. The risk doubles to 40% if you get radiation on top of that.

                                         I mention this because they may recommend this to your husband at some point.

                                       Again God Bless,

                                       Jim M.

                                      Jim M.
                                      Participant

                                        Hi Mary,

                                         Another thing I thought of. After I healed from the CLND my doctor, Jeffrey Weber, recommended I get radiation to the surgery area. Doing this he said would reduce the possibility of a local recurrence from 60% to 10%. Quite an  impressive difference. I went ahead with the radiation. I had a preliminary consultation with Dr. Berg in Tampa. Since we live almost 3 hours from Tampa I chose to find a local radiation oncologist. The trade off is with surgery alone the risk of getting lymphedema is 20%. The risk doubles to 40% if you get radiation on top of that.

                                           I mention this because they may recommend this to your husband at some point.

                                         Again God Bless,

                                         Jim M.

                                        flvermonter
                                        Participant

                                          Hi Jim and thanks for the point to bring up with his Dr after the surgery.  He had his stress test today and seemed to do ok. Waiting for the Cardiologist to call us with the ok.  Regards Mary

                                          flvermonter
                                          Participant

                                            Hi Jim and thanks for the point to bring up with his Dr after the surgery.  He had his stress test today and seemed to do ok. Waiting for the Cardiologist to call us with the ok.  Regards Mary

                                            flvermonter
                                            Participant

                                              Hi Jim and thanks for the point to bring up with his Dr after the surgery.  He had his stress test today and seemed to do ok. Waiting for the Cardiologist to call us with the ok.  Regards Mary

                                              Jim M.
                                              Participant

                                                Hi Mary,

                                                 Another thing I thought of. After I healed from the CLND my doctor, Jeffrey Weber, recommended I get radiation to the surgery area. Doing this he said would reduce the possibility of a local recurrence from 60% to 10%. Quite an  impressive difference. I went ahead with the radiation. I had a preliminary consultation with Dr. Berg in Tampa. Since we live almost 3 hours from Tampa I chose to find a local radiation oncologist. The trade off is with surgery alone the risk of getting lymphedema is 20%. The risk doubles to 40% if you get radiation on top of that.

                                                   I mention this because they may recommend this to your husband at some point.

                                                 Again God Bless,

                                                 Jim M.

                                                flvermonter
                                                Participant

                                                  Hi Jim,

                                                  Thanks so much for the information and it does help.  Dr Tolazo has ordered a stress test for my husband and he is taking that today.  We should know later today, tomorrow if there are any problems.  We really like Dr Zager, he has been straight and very compassionate with us through this process.

                                                  I will definitly heed the words from the hospital and watch out for lymphedema. Hope you had a good holiday weekend and thanks again.  Regards, Mary

                                                  flvermonter
                                                  Participant

                                                    Hi Jim,

                                                    Thanks so much for the information and it does help.  Dr Tolazo has ordered a stress test for my husband and he is taking that today.  We should know later today, tomorrow if there are any problems.  We really like Dr Zager, he has been straight and very compassionate with us through this process.

                                                    I will definitly heed the words from the hospital and watch out for lymphedema. Hope you had a good holiday weekend and thanks again.  Regards, Mary

                                              Viewing 8 reply threads
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