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WLE today

Forums General Melanoma Community WLE today

  • Post
    Michelle820
    Participant

      Hi, I am new to this site. Today I had a WLE for a melanoma in situ on my left breast-very awkward surgery:/. I am very thankful that itwas caught early. However, now I'm having the mental part of the diagnosis weighing me down:(  I have always had issues with my sun damaged skin-way too many basal cells to count, but now having the "M" word hit me. Luckily, I was able to get into the pigmented lesion group at UPENN. I was very impressed there. The Dr seems concerned that I have a lot of "moles". He suggested that Iparticipate in skin photography.  Not too keen on getting body shots:/ if it will help I will do it. I'm nervous that I will end up with more biopsys to come which means more scars. I already have two on my forehead that I'm self conscious about. 

      Just needed to vent about today-everything went okay but really wish it was not done under local. Being in the OR draped from head to toe, they covered my head and face! Almost had to ask them to move the towels and drape so I could breathe lol. I know the surgery location was the reason, but I didn't like that at all. Plus, hearing and smelling the skin burn is gross! And the tugging from sutures isn't pleasant either. Ughhhh definitely was more intense than what I expected:(

      Thanks for listening. This seems like a very helpful and supportive site. 

    Viewing 5 reply threads
    • Replies
        Aloha14
        Participant

          Hi,

          I'm fairly new ( a few weeks) to this board and it's great for information and support. I'm impressed that you had surgery today and are feeling well enough to post. 

          I'm glad your Melanoma was caught early, and your surgery to remove it is finished. Being awake for that seems scary but then you don't have to deal with being so drugged up. Yes, getting this diagnosis is terrifying that's for sure. 

          My melanoma was on on my lower leg and just looked like a clear circular blister. I see you've joined the pigmented lesion group at UPENN, was your melanoma a dark color and typical looking? It's good you have a live support group close by. 

          I also have a lot of moles from being in the sun and I'm definitely going to be piling on the sunscreen from now on. Nobody likes scars but it's sure better than having cancers. Get some rest. 

           

          Aloha14
          Participant

            Hi,

            I'm fairly new ( a few weeks) to this board and it's great for information and support. I'm impressed that you had surgery today and are feeling well enough to post. 

            I'm glad your Melanoma was caught early, and your surgery to remove it is finished. Being awake for that seems scary but then you don't have to deal with being so drugged up. Yes, getting this diagnosis is terrifying that's for sure. 

            My melanoma was on on my lower leg and just looked like a clear circular blister. I see you've joined the pigmented lesion group at UPENN, was your melanoma a dark color and typical looking? It's good you have a live support group close by. 

            I also have a lot of moles from being in the sun and I'm definitely going to be piling on the sunscreen from now on. Nobody likes scars but it's sure better than having cancers. Get some rest. 

             

              Michelle820
              Participant

                Thank you for your kind words:) when did you have your surgery if you don't mind me asking?

                My area of concern basically looked like a very dark, black freckle. It started out a year or so ago as a dot. It was in a  place that has never seen the sun. Over the past year or so, it slowly grew. It was smaller than an eraser tip but black. The edges were symmetrical too. Not a typical ABCD irregularity. Only suspicion was the color. 

                After my first spot at Penn I came home and checked just about every spot on me. I think* I found another black dot under my arm (armpit area). Again it's tiny but I will show the Dr. One dr used the term "ugly duckling" sign- when one spot doesn't resemble any of the others. That's this one too:/

                and I agree, Id rather have tons of scars-it could be worse. I am thankful and grateful this was caught early. It's just extremely hard not to worry. It's like everyone I look has a bad looking spot on their skin and I want t say something but awkwardly can't. My eyes have forever changed:/

                 

                Michelle820
                Participant

                  Thank you for your kind words:) when did you have your surgery if you don't mind me asking?

                  My area of concern basically looked like a very dark, black freckle. It started out a year or so ago as a dot. It was in a  place that has never seen the sun. Over the past year or so, it slowly grew. It was smaller than an eraser tip but black. The edges were symmetrical too. Not a typical ABCD irregularity. Only suspicion was the color. 

                  After my first spot at Penn I came home and checked just about every spot on me. I think* I found another black dot under my arm (armpit area). Again it's tiny but I will show the Dr. One dr used the term "ugly duckling" sign- when one spot doesn't resemble any of the others. That's this one too:/

                  and I agree, Id rather have tons of scars-it could be worse. I am thankful and grateful this was caught early. It's just extremely hard not to worry. It's like everyone I look has a bad looking spot on their skin and I want t say something but awkwardly can't. My eyes have forever changed:/

                   

                  Michelle820
                  Participant

                    Thank you for your kind words:) when did you have your surgery if you don't mind me asking?

                    My area of concern basically looked like a very dark, black freckle. It started out a year or so ago as a dot. It was in a  place that has never seen the sun. Over the past year or so, it slowly grew. It was smaller than an eraser tip but black. The edges were symmetrical too. Not a typical ABCD irregularity. Only suspicion was the color. 

                    After my first spot at Penn I came home and checked just about every spot on me. I think* I found another black dot under my arm (armpit area). Again it's tiny but I will show the Dr. One dr used the term "ugly duckling" sign- when one spot doesn't resemble any of the others. That's this one too:/

                    and I agree, Id rather have tons of scars-it could be worse. I am thankful and grateful this was caught early. It's just extremely hard not to worry. It's like everyone I look has a bad looking spot on their skin and I want t say something but awkwardly can't. My eyes have forever changed:/

                     

                  Aloha14
                  Participant

                    Hi,

                    I'm fairly new ( a few weeks) to this board and it's great for information and support. I'm impressed that you had surgery today and are feeling well enough to post. 

                    I'm glad your Melanoma was caught early, and your surgery to remove it is finished. Being awake for that seems scary but then you don't have to deal with being so drugged up. Yes, getting this diagnosis is terrifying that's for sure. 

                    My melanoma was on on my lower leg and just looked like a clear circular blister. I see you've joined the pigmented lesion group at UPENN, was your melanoma a dark color and typical looking? It's good you have a live support group close by. 

                    I also have a lot of moles from being in the sun and I'm definitely going to be piling on the sunscreen from now on. Nobody likes scars but it's sure better than having cancers. Get some rest. 

                     

                    BillMFl
                    Participant

                      My history was very similar to yours. Too many BCCs and SQs to count,  Was told high risk for MM. Studied up on how they develope and how to spot them as early as possible. Spotted my two in-situ's myself. Both times the Derms – first Derm had retired- probably nothing to worry about but we will biopsy to be sure. Both biopsies came back positive.  We were both lucky to find ours early. Now you know the drill and know what to look for. We all need to be our own advocates. Do regular self exams in front of a mirror. Get to know all your moles and then watch for changes in size, shape or color. I choose to be totally responsible for myself. My regular Derm visits are for back up. The first one was the worst because of anxiety,  Now I see it as a challenge to get it before it can get me.  With a little study you can be almost as good at detecting problems as your derm. Even better. We see ourselves daily. The derm has many patients and can't remember everything you may have for moles, etc.  You can keep your eye on them all and get them early!  Try not to worry too much. You dodged a bullet and now you are better prepared.  Anxiety was a problem for me for some time.  I have since survived another major cancer surgery not related to melanoma,  Regular physical exams caught it early enough to survive but required a very difficult surgery and a long recovery,  And then my wife survived breast cancer after lengthy mutiple procedures.  So we helped each other get through some tough times. The old saying that what doesn't kill you makes you stronger is true for us. My wife is a dedicated RN who has worked in both ICU and surgery, so we are both able to advise and assist friends and relatives, some of whom are fighting for their lives.  This forum is a very good source of info. I spent a lot of time here back in the early days after the Pattersons started it. A lot of us got to know each other very well and became very close. We had to say goodbye to too many but they will never be forgotten.

                        Michelle820
                        Participant

                          Bill, thank you for your support and encouragement! You are correct that we have to be our own advocate and pay close attention to our own bodies. It can become different when life gets busy with famil, work, etc.

                          I am so sorry that you and your wife have had other major  health issues. Praying those become moments of the past. 

                          I also agree that the anxiety dealing with this can become a little overwhelming.  I'm taking this as a wake up call and not blowing off my check ups anymore. Thanks again for your support. It means a lot:)

                          Michelle820
                          Participant

                            Bill, thank you for your support and encouragement! You are correct that we have to be our own advocate and pay close attention to our own bodies. It can become different when life gets busy with famil, work, etc.

                            I am so sorry that you and your wife have had other major  health issues. Praying those become moments of the past. 

                            I also agree that the anxiety dealing with this can become a little overwhelming.  I'm taking this as a wake up call and not blowing off my check ups anymore. Thanks again for your support. It means a lot:)

                            Michelle820
                            Participant

                              Bill, thank you for your support and encouragement! You are correct that we have to be our own advocate and pay close attention to our own bodies. It can become different when life gets busy with famil, work, etc.

                              I am so sorry that you and your wife have had other major  health issues. Praying those become moments of the past. 

                              I also agree that the anxiety dealing with this can become a little overwhelming.  I'm taking this as a wake up call and not blowing off my check ups anymore. Thanks again for your support. It means a lot:)

                            BillMFl
                            Participant

                              My history was very similar to yours. Too many BCCs and SQs to count,  Was told high risk for MM. Studied up on how they develope and how to spot them as early as possible. Spotted my two in-situ's myself. Both times the Derms – first Derm had retired- probably nothing to worry about but we will biopsy to be sure. Both biopsies came back positive.  We were both lucky to find ours early. Now you know the drill and know what to look for. We all need to be our own advocates. Do regular self exams in front of a mirror. Get to know all your moles and then watch for changes in size, shape or color. I choose to be totally responsible for myself. My regular Derm visits are for back up. The first one was the worst because of anxiety,  Now I see it as a challenge to get it before it can get me.  With a little study you can be almost as good at detecting problems as your derm. Even better. We see ourselves daily. The derm has many patients and can't remember everything you may have for moles, etc.  You can keep your eye on them all and get them early!  Try not to worry too much. You dodged a bullet and now you are better prepared.  Anxiety was a problem for me for some time.  I have since survived another major cancer surgery not related to melanoma,  Regular physical exams caught it early enough to survive but required a very difficult surgery and a long recovery,  And then my wife survived breast cancer after lengthy mutiple procedures.  So we helped each other get through some tough times. The old saying that what doesn't kill you makes you stronger is true for us. My wife is a dedicated RN who has worked in both ICU and surgery, so we are both able to advise and assist friends and relatives, some of whom are fighting for their lives.  This forum is a very good source of info. I spent a lot of time here back in the early days after the Pattersons started it. A lot of us got to know each other very well and became very close. We had to say goodbye to too many but they will never be forgotten.

                              BillMFl
                              Participant

                                My history was very similar to yours. Too many BCCs and SQs to count,  Was told high risk for MM. Studied up on how they develope and how to spot them as early as possible. Spotted my two in-situ's myself. Both times the Derms – first Derm had retired- probably nothing to worry about but we will biopsy to be sure. Both biopsies came back positive.  We were both lucky to find ours early. Now you know the drill and know what to look for. We all need to be our own advocates. Do regular self exams in front of a mirror. Get to know all your moles and then watch for changes in size, shape or color. I choose to be totally responsible for myself. My regular Derm visits are for back up. The first one was the worst because of anxiety,  Now I see it as a challenge to get it before it can get me.  With a little study you can be almost as good at detecting problems as your derm. Even better. We see ourselves daily. The derm has many patients and can't remember everything you may have for moles, etc.  You can keep your eye on them all and get them early!  Try not to worry too much. You dodged a bullet and now you are better prepared.  Anxiety was a problem for me for some time.  I have since survived another major cancer surgery not related to melanoma,  Regular physical exams caught it early enough to survive but required a very difficult surgery and a long recovery,  And then my wife survived breast cancer after lengthy mutiple procedures.  So we helped each other get through some tough times. The old saying that what doesn't kill you makes you stronger is true for us. My wife is a dedicated RN who has worked in both ICU and surgery, so we are both able to advise and assist friends and relatives, some of whom are fighting for their lives.  This forum is a very good source of info. I spent a lot of time here back in the early days after the Pattersons started it. A lot of us got to know each other very well and became very close. We had to say goodbye to too many but they will never be forgotten.

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