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stage 2 melanoma with 1 bad lymph node?

Forums General Melanoma Community stage 2 melanoma with 1 bad lymph node?

  • Post
    vladimir3d
    Participant

      someone i know was diagnosed with stage 2 melanoma, lymph node biopsy was performed and one lymph node came out bad, yet it was still stage 2 localised??  isn't spreading to lymph node considered stage 3?  Lymph node was removed.

      someone i know was diagnosed with stage 2 melanoma, lymph node biopsy was performed and one lymph node came out bad, yet it was still stage 2 localised??  isn't spreading to lymph node considered stage 3?  Lymph node was removed.

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    • Replies
        Janner
        Participant

          You are correct.  While the original staging my be Stage II based on depth, once a lymph node is positive for melanoma, the staging now becomes at least Stage III.  More info would be needed to determine Stage IIIA/B/C.

          Janner

            vladimir3d
            Participant

              only one lymph node involved, was removed.  she will go to radiation therapy.  What are her chances?

              Janner
              Participant

                Was the lymph node totally involved?  Microscopic disease?  In general, radiation isn't all that effective against melanoma.  It can be used for localized control – say for example the lymph node had extracapsular extension meaning the cells were no longer confined to the lymph node but had broken out into the surrounding tissue.  Radiation can help control that.  But if the melanoma were confined totally inside the lymph node and that was removed surgically, radiation isn't typically used much (at least in the US).  Is she being seen by a melanoma specialist?  Where is she located?  Is she having the other lymph nodes removed as well? 

                As for her chances, no one can say.  Surgery is curative in some percentage of stage III disease.  In other instances, melanoma can come back months or years later.  There are some new treatments for advanced disease which have become available in the last two years so historical survival numbers may not be reflective of current odds.

                vladimir3d
                Participant

                  right now only one lymph node was removed, she is in illinois the rest came out clear.  She is seeing a dermo surgeon who she claims to tbe the best in the area, i am trying to figure things out while clock is ticking.  she has no health insurance, i pay. 

                  medicaid and gov insurance denied.   i am trying to talk to dr himself but hipaa and she is very difficult to deal with to begin with.  i want her on immune therapy and lymph node mapping every month.

                  vladimir3d
                  Participant

                    right now only one lymph node was removed, she is in illinois the rest came out clear.  She is seeing a dermo surgeon who she claims to tbe the best in the area, i am trying to figure things out while clock is ticking.  she has no health insurance, i pay. 

                    medicaid and gov insurance denied.   i am trying to talk to dr himself but hipaa and she is very difficult to deal with to begin with.  i want her on immune therapy and lymph node mapping every month.

                    Janner
                    Participant

                      Interferon (immune therapy for stage III) is very expensive.  You might try contacting the manufacturer and seeing if they can provide financial assistance if you choose to go that route.  You also might try looking for a clinical trial that compares Interferon to Yervoy.  Clinical trials provide the drug free of charge although scans and other routine costs must be handled by insurance or the patient.  Also, some states have a high risk insurance pool that you could check out as well.  Lymph node mapping isn't something that is typically done – I'm not sure exactly what you mean by that.  Ultrasound monitoring to watch for metastases has been done instead of removing all the lymph nodes surgically, but I've not heard of it being used when the lymph nodes have already been removed.  You can go to this link to find a NCI designated cancer center – they are likely to have the most options for treatment.  http://www.cancer.gov/researchandfunding/extramural/cancercenters/find-a-cancer-center. 

                      Janner
                      Participant

                        Interferon (immune therapy for stage III) is very expensive.  You might try contacting the manufacturer and seeing if they can provide financial assistance if you choose to go that route.  You also might try looking for a clinical trial that compares Interferon to Yervoy.  Clinical trials provide the drug free of charge although scans and other routine costs must be handled by insurance or the patient.  Also, some states have a high risk insurance pool that you could check out as well.  Lymph node mapping isn't something that is typically done – I'm not sure exactly what you mean by that.  Ultrasound monitoring to watch for metastases has been done instead of removing all the lymph nodes surgically, but I've not heard of it being used when the lymph nodes have already been removed.  You can go to this link to find a NCI designated cancer center – they are likely to have the most options for treatment.  http://www.cancer.gov/researchandfunding/extramural/cancercenters/find-a-cancer-center. 

                        Janner
                        Participant

                          Interferon (immune therapy for stage III) is very expensive.  You might try contacting the manufacturer and seeing if they can provide financial assistance if you choose to go that route.  You also might try looking for a clinical trial that compares Interferon to Yervoy.  Clinical trials provide the drug free of charge although scans and other routine costs must be handled by insurance or the patient.  Also, some states have a high risk insurance pool that you could check out as well.  Lymph node mapping isn't something that is typically done – I'm not sure exactly what you mean by that.  Ultrasound monitoring to watch for metastases has been done instead of removing all the lymph nodes surgically, but I've not heard of it being used when the lymph nodes have already been removed.  You can go to this link to find a NCI designated cancer center – they are likely to have the most options for treatment.  http://www.cancer.gov/researchandfunding/extramural/cancercenters/find-a-cancer-center. 

                          vladimir3d
                          Participant

                            right now only one lymph node was removed, she is in illinois the rest came out clear.  She is seeing a dermo surgeon who she claims to tbe the best in the area, i am trying to figure things out while clock is ticking.  she has no health insurance, i pay. 

                            medicaid and gov insurance denied.   i am trying to talk to dr himself but hipaa and she is very difficult to deal with to begin with.  i want her on immune therapy and lymph node mapping every month.

                            Janner
                            Participant

                              Was the lymph node totally involved?  Microscopic disease?  In general, radiation isn't all that effective against melanoma.  It can be used for localized control – say for example the lymph node had extracapsular extension meaning the cells were no longer confined to the lymph node but had broken out into the surrounding tissue.  Radiation can help control that.  But if the melanoma were confined totally inside the lymph node and that was removed surgically, radiation isn't typically used much (at least in the US).  Is she being seen by a melanoma specialist?  Where is she located?  Is she having the other lymph nodes removed as well? 

                              As for her chances, no one can say.  Surgery is curative in some percentage of stage III disease.  In other instances, melanoma can come back months or years later.  There are some new treatments for advanced disease which have become available in the last two years so historical survival numbers may not be reflective of current odds.

                              Janner
                              Participant

                                Was the lymph node totally involved?  Microscopic disease?  In general, radiation isn't all that effective against melanoma.  It can be used for localized control – say for example the lymph node had extracapsular extension meaning the cells were no longer confined to the lymph node but had broken out into the surrounding tissue.  Radiation can help control that.  But if the melanoma were confined totally inside the lymph node and that was removed surgically, radiation isn't typically used much (at least in the US).  Is she being seen by a melanoma specialist?  Where is she located?  Is she having the other lymph nodes removed as well? 

                                As for her chances, no one can say.  Surgery is curative in some percentage of stage III disease.  In other instances, melanoma can come back months or years later.  There are some new treatments for advanced disease which have become available in the last two years so historical survival numbers may not be reflective of current odds.

                                vladimir3d
                                Participant

                                  only one lymph node involved, was removed.  she will go to radiation therapy.  What are her chances?

                                  vladimir3d
                                  Participant

                                    only one lymph node involved, was removed.  she will go to radiation therapy.  What are her chances?

                                  Janner
                                  Participant

                                    You are correct.  While the original staging my be Stage II based on depth, once a lymph node is positive for melanoma, the staging now becomes at least Stage III.  More info would be needed to determine Stage IIIA/B/C.

                                    Janner

                                    Janner
                                    Participant

                                      You are correct.  While the original staging my be Stage II based on depth, once a lymph node is positive for melanoma, the staging now becomes at least Stage III.  More info would be needed to determine Stage IIIA/B/C.

                                      Janner

                                      alicia
                                      Participant
                                        With stage II melanoma the surgeon always removes at least one lymph node to biopsy it. Make sure to ask the pathology results from the lymph node removed. If indeed the cancer has spread to that one lymph node then the patient is staged at stage III. I just wanted you to know that a lymoh node is always removed for biopsy and doesn’t mean the node is bad. They just remove it to check for cancer cells. A lot of surgeons recommend removing more lymph nodes if the sentinel node is positive or doing ultrasound surveillance if micro involved. Best wishes, Alicia
                                        alicia
                                        Participant
                                          With stage II melanoma the surgeon always removes at least one lymph node to biopsy it. Make sure to ask the pathology results from the lymph node removed. If indeed the cancer has spread to that one lymph node then the patient is staged at stage III. I just wanted you to know that a lymoh node is always removed for biopsy and doesn’t mean the node is bad. They just remove it to check for cancer cells. A lot of surgeons recommend removing more lymph nodes if the sentinel node is positive or doing ultrasound surveillance if micro involved. Best wishes, Alicia
                                          alicia
                                          Participant
                                            With stage II melanoma the surgeon always removes at least one lymph node to biopsy it. Make sure to ask the pathology results from the lymph node removed. If indeed the cancer has spread to that one lymph node then the patient is staged at stage III. I just wanted you to know that a lymoh node is always removed for biopsy and doesn’t mean the node is bad. They just remove it to check for cancer cells. A lot of surgeons recommend removing more lymph nodes if the sentinel node is positive or doing ultrasound surveillance if micro involved. Best wishes, Alicia
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