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Have any of you had a whipple procedure?

Forums General Melanoma Community Have any of you had a whipple procedure?

  • Post
    Angela C
    Participant

      Hello.

      I have a tumor behind my pancreas and we are discussing having it removed via surgery, along with the tumor in my adrenal gland. I heard from my oncologist today and after his discussion with the surgeon, they believe that a whipple procedure would be needed. They would have to remove part of the head of the pancreas to be able to reach the tumor. So, part of the pancreas would be removed, there is a possibility of some of the stomach having to be removed as well. They also have to take part of the duodenum and then change the path that the pancreatic juices take.

      Hello.

      I have a tumor behind my pancreas and we are discussing having it removed via surgery, along with the tumor in my adrenal gland. I heard from my oncologist today and after his discussion with the surgeon, they believe that a whipple procedure would be needed. They would have to remove part of the head of the pancreas to be able to reach the tumor. So, part of the pancreas would be removed, there is a possibility of some of the stomach having to be removed as well. They also have to take part of the duodenum and then change the path that the pancreatic juices take.

      I don't have a complete undersanding of the procedure just yet, but the doctor said it's a major procedure with some possible long term side effects, like a change in eating habits if they have to take part of the stomach. It also sounds like there is a higher level of risk than any other surgery I've had in the past and a higher risk of not making it through this surgery. Part of the reason for this is that these lymph nodes (tumor) are right next to a major blood supply and the adrenal tumor is also right next to the vena cava. So, there is a fair amount of risk with this surgery.

      It all sounds very scary. I have a consult at NIH next Thursday to talk about getting into the TIL trial. So, if that is the case, this surgery would be done there. I would imagine they are very talented doctors and probably some of the best that I could have performing a surgery like this. I've done IL-2, MDX-1106 and Yervoy. So, I think TIL is about the only treatment option besides surgery available for me.

      Just wondered if any of you have had a whipple procedure?

      Thanks!

      ~Angela

    Viewing 5 reply threads
    • Replies
        LynnLuc
        Participant

          Hi Angela, I had a thoracotomy to remove my 6.8 cent melanoma that was pressing against the superior vena cava. They initially refused to do surgery because of the location…they risk is greater because of all the main vessels there. I had no choice as it was blocking off my blood supply to the top half of my body. I had surgery done at Mayo Clinic with Dr K. Robert Shen. It was a very painful surgery but I am still standing and am Stage 4 and NED. My 2nd NED anniversary is March 26.! I am on MDX 1106 /peptide trial and and currently in the booster phase, getting MDX 1106 every 3 months. I have one more year of boosters. Good Luck in whatever you decide. I heard TIL is rough because they take out your immune system before givibg you your T cells and IL-2 or other IL . I know of one man whose bone marrow was taken out and did not recover and is now in hospice- he went to the NIH.

          LynnLuc
          Participant

            Hi Angela, I had a thoracotomy to remove my 6.8 cent melanoma that was pressing against the superior vena cava. They initially refused to do surgery because of the location…they risk is greater because of all the main vessels there. I had no choice as it was blocking off my blood supply to the top half of my body. I had surgery done at Mayo Clinic with Dr K. Robert Shen. It was a very painful surgery but I am still standing and am Stage 4 and NED. My 2nd NED anniversary is March 26.! I am on MDX 1106 /peptide trial and and currently in the booster phase, getting MDX 1106 every 3 months. I have one more year of boosters. Good Luck in whatever you decide. I heard TIL is rough because they take out your immune system before givibg you your T cells and IL-2 or other IL . I know of one man whose bone marrow was taken out and did not recover and is now in hospice- he went to the NIH.

              LynnLuc
              Participant

                PS: I found this:

                The Whipple procedure, or pancreatoduodenectomy, is an invasive surgery that involves removal of the gallbladder, the common bile duct, portions of the duodenum and stomach, and the head of the pancreas. The procedure is most commonly used to treat pancreatic cancer.

                1. Significance

                  • The Whipple procedure is used to treat cancers of the digestive system, including pancreatic cancer and small bowel cancer. The procedure is a viable alternative to radiation treatment and chemotherapy.

                  Recovery

                  • On average, patients leave the hospital 14 days after the surgery. Recovery time varies, with many patients reporting a return of energy and digestion between three months and a year after a successful surgery.

                  Diet

                  • The pancreas is responsible for helping the body store energy and creating digestive enzymes to break down food. After the surgery, sugary fruits, fatty foods and dairy foods become difficult to process. Eating many small meals a day helps to overcome this issue.

                  Origin

                  • The Whipple procedure gets its name from its creator, Dr. Allen Oldfather Whipple, who first performed the technique in 1935.

                  Famous Ties

                  • Both Steve Jobs and Patrick Swayze benefited from the Whipple procedure.

                 

                 

                Read more: Whipple Procedure | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/facts_5348621_whipple-procedure.html#ixzz1mipKyqLu

                LynnLuc
                Participant

                  PS: I found this:

                  The Whipple procedure, or pancreatoduodenectomy, is an invasive surgery that involves removal of the gallbladder, the common bile duct, portions of the duodenum and stomach, and the head of the pancreas. The procedure is most commonly used to treat pancreatic cancer.

                  1. Significance

                    • The Whipple procedure is used to treat cancers of the digestive system, including pancreatic cancer and small bowel cancer. The procedure is a viable alternative to radiation treatment and chemotherapy.

                    Recovery

                    • On average, patients leave the hospital 14 days after the surgery. Recovery time varies, with many patients reporting a return of energy and digestion between three months and a year after a successful surgery.

                    Diet

                    • The pancreas is responsible for helping the body store energy and creating digestive enzymes to break down food. After the surgery, sugary fruits, fatty foods and dairy foods become difficult to process. Eating many small meals a day helps to overcome this issue.

                    Origin

                    • The Whipple procedure gets its name from its creator, Dr. Allen Oldfather Whipple, who first performed the technique in 1935.

                    Famous Ties

                    • Both Steve Jobs and Patrick Swayze benefited from the Whipple procedure.

                   

                   

                  Read more: Whipple Procedure | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/facts_5348621_whipple-procedure.html#ixzz1mipKyqLu

                  LynnLuc
                  Participant

                    PS: I found this:

                    The Whipple procedure, or pancreatoduodenectomy, is an invasive surgery that involves removal of the gallbladder, the common bile duct, portions of the duodenum and stomach, and the head of the pancreas. The procedure is most commonly used to treat pancreatic cancer.

                    1. Significance

                      • The Whipple procedure is used to treat cancers of the digestive system, including pancreatic cancer and small bowel cancer. The procedure is a viable alternative to radiation treatment and chemotherapy.

                      Recovery

                      • On average, patients leave the hospital 14 days after the surgery. Recovery time varies, with many patients reporting a return of energy and digestion between three months and a year after a successful surgery.

                      Diet

                      • The pancreas is responsible for helping the body store energy and creating digestive enzymes to break down food. After the surgery, sugary fruits, fatty foods and dairy foods become difficult to process. Eating many small meals a day helps to overcome this issue.

                      Origin

                      • The Whipple procedure gets its name from its creator, Dr. Allen Oldfather Whipple, who first performed the technique in 1935.

                      Famous Ties

                      • Both Steve Jobs and Patrick Swayze benefited from the Whipple procedure.

                     

                     

                    Read more: Whipple Procedure | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/facts_5348621_whipple-procedure.html#ixzz1mipKyqLu

                  LynnLuc
                  Participant

                    Hi Angela, I had a thoracotomy to remove my 6.8 cent melanoma that was pressing against the superior vena cava. They initially refused to do surgery because of the location…they risk is greater because of all the main vessels there. I had no choice as it was blocking off my blood supply to the top half of my body. I had surgery done at Mayo Clinic with Dr K. Robert Shen. It was a very painful surgery but I am still standing and am Stage 4 and NED. My 2nd NED anniversary is March 26.! I am on MDX 1106 /peptide trial and and currently in the booster phase, getting MDX 1106 every 3 months. I have one more year of boosters. Good Luck in whatever you decide. I heard TIL is rough because they take out your immune system before givibg you your T cells and IL-2 or other IL . I know of one man whose bone marrow was taken out and did not recover and is now in hospice- he went to the NIH.

                    tammy4102
                    Participant

                      Hi,

                          I was just wondering if you decided to go through with the Whipple surgery? My husband had his on May 7th this year, the doctors basically told him it was the only chance he had to beat his Pancreatic Cancer. On our last visit with the Oncologist, she said without the chemo he could expect it back in around 7 months and with the chemo around 14 months. His was what they called a high grade tumor (fast growing from what i have read). It was 3.7cm in size and they said he is stage 2. He starts his chemo on Monday the 30th. He had complications with his surgery that set him back a little. He developed infection and they had to hook up a wound vac to the incision. It helped the healing process a lot. He still has to keep gauze on it because its still leaking, but it is looking better. He is still very weak and gets sick a lot. He cant eat a lot of different foods such as cheese or anything with a lot of flavor it seems. The more bland the better. If you decide to go with the surgery i wish you all the luck in the world for a speedy recovery and success. Its a very rough road right now and hoping it gets better soon.  Tammy

                      tammy4102
                      Participant

                        Hi,

                            I was just wondering if you decided to go through with the Whipple surgery? My husband had his on May 7th this year, the doctors basically told him it was the only chance he had to beat his Pancreatic Cancer. On our last visit with the Oncologist, she said without the chemo he could expect it back in around 7 months and with the chemo around 14 months. His was what they called a high grade tumor (fast growing from what i have read). It was 3.7cm in size and they said he is stage 2. He starts his chemo on Monday the 30th. He had complications with his surgery that set him back a little. He developed infection and they had to hook up a wound vac to the incision. It helped the healing process a lot. He still has to keep gauze on it because its still leaking, but it is looking better. He is still very weak and gets sick a lot. He cant eat a lot of different foods such as cheese or anything with a lot of flavor it seems. The more bland the better. If you decide to go with the surgery i wish you all the luck in the world for a speedy recovery and success. Its a very rough road right now and hoping it gets better soon.  Tammy

                        tammy4102
                        Participant

                          Hi,

                              I was just wondering if you decided to go through with the Whipple surgery? My husband had his on May 7th this year, the doctors basically told him it was the only chance he had to beat his Pancreatic Cancer. On our last visit with the Oncologist, she said without the chemo he could expect it back in around 7 months and with the chemo around 14 months. His was what they called a high grade tumor (fast growing from what i have read). It was 3.7cm in size and they said he is stage 2. He starts his chemo on Monday the 30th. He had complications with his surgery that set him back a little. He developed infection and they had to hook up a wound vac to the incision. It helped the healing process a lot. He still has to keep gauze on it because its still leaking, but it is looking better. He is still very weak and gets sick a lot. He cant eat a lot of different foods such as cheese or anything with a lot of flavor it seems. The more bland the better. If you decide to go with the surgery i wish you all the luck in the world for a speedy recovery and success. Its a very rough road right now and hoping it gets better soon.  Tammy

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