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Extremely elevated b12-have questions

Forums General Melanoma Community Extremely elevated b12-have questions

  • Post
    Jamietk
    Participant

      Anyone with liver mets have elevated b12? Normal levels are 200-900. Mine came back at 7500. My Dr. says it must be a lab error. I sure hope so, because everything I read says cirrhosis, hepatitis, liver mets, and leukemia are associated with these extremely high and rare levels. Anyone with liver mets have elevated b12? Any other thoughts on this? Thanks for your comments.

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        JerryfromFauq
        Participant

          Mine are high, but nothing in that range!  1.325 where 850 iw my labs top of "normal".  The first thing will be to get new blood test for the B-12.

           

          Use cautiously in people with low serum levels of potassium, as the correction of megaloblastic anemia with vitamin B12 may result in fatally low potassium levels.

           

          http://healthyeating.sfgate.com/high-vitamin-b12-serum-levels-6037.html
           

          High B12 Levels

          If your blood test reveals a high vitamin B12 level, it could indicate an underlying medical condition. In “Laboratory and Diagnostic Tests with Nursing Implications,” author Joyce LeFever Kee explains that elevated vitamin B12 is often seen with acute hepatitis, polycythemia vera and myelocytic leukemia. Elevated levels might also be seen with other medical conditions, such as chronic liver disease and cirrhosis. Certain oral contraceptive medications might also cause elevated vitamin B12 levels. It’s important to note that the elevated vitamin B12 level is not the cause of these diseases — it's simply a symptom associated with the diseases.

          Toxicity Concerns

          Since vitamin B12 is dissolved in water, the body simply excretes excess amounts through the urine. In fact, the Office of Dietary Supplements explains that it has a low potential for toxicity. The website goes on to explain that no adverse effects have been associated with high serum levels of vitamin B12.

           

          JerryfromFauq
          Participant

            Mine are high, but nothing in that range!  1.325 where 850 iw my labs top of "normal".  The first thing will be to get new blood test for the B-12.

             

            Use cautiously in people with low serum levels of potassium, as the correction of megaloblastic anemia with vitamin B12 may result in fatally low potassium levels.

             

            http://healthyeating.sfgate.com/high-vitamin-b12-serum-levels-6037.html
             

            High B12 Levels

            If your blood test reveals a high vitamin B12 level, it could indicate an underlying medical condition. In “Laboratory and Diagnostic Tests with Nursing Implications,” author Joyce LeFever Kee explains that elevated vitamin B12 is often seen with acute hepatitis, polycythemia vera and myelocytic leukemia. Elevated levels might also be seen with other medical conditions, such as chronic liver disease and cirrhosis. Certain oral contraceptive medications might also cause elevated vitamin B12 levels. It’s important to note that the elevated vitamin B12 level is not the cause of these diseases — it's simply a symptom associated with the diseases.

            Toxicity Concerns

            Since vitamin B12 is dissolved in water, the body simply excretes excess amounts through the urine. In fact, the Office of Dietary Supplements explains that it has a low potential for toxicity. The website goes on to explain that no adverse effects have been associated with high serum levels of vitamin B12.

             

            JerryfromFauq
            Participant

              Mine are high, but nothing in that range!  1.325 where 850 iw my labs top of "normal".  The first thing will be to get new blood test for the B-12.

               

              Use cautiously in people with low serum levels of potassium, as the correction of megaloblastic anemia with vitamin B12 may result in fatally low potassium levels.

               

              http://healthyeating.sfgate.com/high-vitamin-b12-serum-levels-6037.html
               

              High B12 Levels

              If your blood test reveals a high vitamin B12 level, it could indicate an underlying medical condition. In “Laboratory and Diagnostic Tests with Nursing Implications,” author Joyce LeFever Kee explains that elevated vitamin B12 is often seen with acute hepatitis, polycythemia vera and myelocytic leukemia. Elevated levels might also be seen with other medical conditions, such as chronic liver disease and cirrhosis. Certain oral contraceptive medications might also cause elevated vitamin B12 levels. It’s important to note that the elevated vitamin B12 level is not the cause of these diseases — it's simply a symptom associated with the diseases.

              Toxicity Concerns

              Since vitamin B12 is dissolved in water, the body simply excretes excess amounts through the urine. In fact, the Office of Dietary Supplements explains that it has a low potential for toxicity. The website goes on to explain that no adverse effects have been associated with high serum levels of vitamin B12.

               

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