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AHCC experiences (Jim M.?)

Forums General Melanoma Community AHCC experiences (Jim M.?)

  • Post
    ChristineL
    Participant

    I've heard about AHCC here and there (mostly there!) and was wondering if anyone would put in their 2 cents as to whether it may be worth it?  Stage IIIb, I figure I may give it a try.  My mel. onc. is skeptical, because she hasn't heard of it.  Thanks for sharing!

    ChristineL

    I've heard about AHCC here and there (mostly there!) and was wondering if anyone would put in their 2 cents as to whether it may be worth it?  Stage IIIb, I figure I may give it a try.  My mel. onc. is skeptical, because she hasn't heard of it.  Thanks for sharing!

    ChristineL

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      ChristineL
      Participant

      Bringing it back to the forefront.

      Good luck!

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      ChristineL
      Participant

      Bringing it back to the forefront.

      Good luck!

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      Jerry from Cape Cod
      Participant

      Sloan Ketterying web site had this info

      Jerry from Cape Cod

      Link http://www.mskcc.org/mskcc/html/69113.cfm

      Clinical Summary

      A proprietary extract prepared from co-cultured mycelia of several species of Basidiomycete mushrooms, including shiitake (Lentinus edodes), active hexose correlated compound (AHCC) is extracted from mushrooms using hot water following an enzyme pretreatment, but specific mushroom source and preparation details have not been fully disclosed. Patients use this to prevent and treat cancer. Animal studies suggest that AHCC has antioxidant effects and may protect against disorders induced by oxidative stress (1) and may also enhance resistance against bacterial (2) (7)and viral infections (3). In healthy humans, AHCC increased dendritic cell number and function (4)

      In vitro and animal studies show that AHCC exhibits some anticancer activities, but the results of these studies are vague (5) (6). In cisplatin-treated mice, AHCC increased its anti-tumor effects and decreased its side effects (8). One prospective cohort study suggested that AHCC improves prognosis after curative resection of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) (9), but no other clinical trials have been performed.

      AHCC can cause interactions with other drugs, include doxorubicin or ondansetron, that are substrates of CYP450 2D6 enzyme (10).

      Mechanism of Action

      AHCC glucans are low molecular weight (~5 KDa) polysaccharides with alpha-1,3 linkages. Both properties are unusual for this class of mushroom glucans with reported immunomodulatory properties (5) although the mechanism of action is not completely known. One animal study suggested that AHCC has antioxidant effects and may protect against disorders induced by oxidative stress (1). Animal studies have shown AHCC to enhance resistance to bacterial infection (7) by increasing inflammatory cytokine and chemokine expression as well as lymphocytes (11). AHCC can enhance mice's resistance to West Nile virus by improving T-cell response (3). In chemotherapy-induced granulocytopenic mice, AHCC improved immune response to Candida albicans (2). In patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and cirrhosis, treatment with AHCC has shown beneficial effects on liver function (9) possibly by regulating nitric oxide (NO) production (12). AHCC has been shown to enhance natural killer (NK) cell activity in vitro and induces endogenous IL-12 in mice (6).


      Herb-Drug Interactions

      AHCC can induce CYP450 2D6 (10). This may decrease the activity of other drugs, like doxorubicin or ondansetron, which are substrates of this enzyme.

      Literature Summary and Critique

      Matsui Y, et al. Improved prognosis of postoperative hepatocellular carcinoma patients when treated with functional foods: a prospective cohort study. J Hepatol 2002;37:78-86.
      A prospective cohort study to determine whether AHCC improves the prognosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients following surgical treatment. 269 patients with histologically confirmed HCC were studied from February 1992 through December 2001. After undergoing curative surgery, some of the patients received 3.0 g/day oral AHCC. Participants were not randomized, nor were placebos administered. Results showed statistically significant lengthening of time to recurrence and overall survival rate when compared to those who did not take AHCC. Three participants in the AHCC group did not complete the trial due to nausea, but overall side effects were minimal. While the study implies a benefit for post surgical HCC treatment, the lack of randomization and placebo control tempers that result.
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      Jerry from Cape Cod
      Participant

      Sloan Ketterying web site had this info

      Jerry from Cape Cod

      Link http://www.mskcc.org/mskcc/html/69113.cfm

      Clinical Summary

      A proprietary extract prepared from co-cultured mycelia of several species of Basidiomycete mushrooms, including shiitake (Lentinus edodes), active hexose correlated compound (AHCC) is extracted from mushrooms using hot water following an enzyme pretreatment, but specific mushroom source and preparation details have not been fully disclosed. Patients use this to prevent and treat cancer. Animal studies suggest that AHCC has antioxidant effects and may protect against disorders induced by oxidative stress (1) and may also enhance resistance against bacterial (2) (7)and viral infections (3). In healthy humans, AHCC increased dendritic cell number and function (4)

      In vitro and animal studies show that AHCC exhibits some anticancer activities, but the results of these studies are vague (5) (6). In cisplatin-treated mice, AHCC increased its anti-tumor effects and decreased its side effects (8). One prospective cohort study suggested that AHCC improves prognosis after curative resection of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) (9), but no other clinical trials have been performed.

      AHCC can cause interactions with other drugs, include doxorubicin or ondansetron, that are substrates of CYP450 2D6 enzyme (10).

      Mechanism of Action

      AHCC glucans are low molecular weight (~5 KDa) polysaccharides with alpha-1,3 linkages. Both properties are unusual for this class of mushroom glucans with reported immunomodulatory properties (5) although the mechanism of action is not completely known. One animal study suggested that AHCC has antioxidant effects and may protect against disorders induced by oxidative stress (1). Animal studies have shown AHCC to enhance resistance to bacterial infection (7) by increasing inflammatory cytokine and chemokine expression as well as lymphocytes (11). AHCC can enhance mice's resistance to West Nile virus by improving T-cell response (3). In chemotherapy-induced granulocytopenic mice, AHCC improved immune response to Candida albicans (2). In patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and cirrhosis, treatment with AHCC has shown beneficial effects on liver function (9) possibly by regulating nitric oxide (NO) production (12). AHCC has been shown to enhance natural killer (NK) cell activity in vitro and induces endogenous IL-12 in mice (6).


      Herb-Drug Interactions

      AHCC can induce CYP450 2D6 (10). This may decrease the activity of other drugs, like doxorubicin or ondansetron, which are substrates of this enzyme.

      Literature Summary and Critique

      Matsui Y, et al. Improved prognosis of postoperative hepatocellular carcinoma patients when treated with functional foods: a prospective cohort study. J Hepatol 2002;37:78-86.
      A prospective cohort study to determine whether AHCC improves the prognosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients following surgical treatment. 269 patients with histologically confirmed HCC were studied from February 1992 through December 2001. After undergoing curative surgery, some of the patients received 3.0 g/day oral AHCC. Participants were not randomized, nor were placebos administered. Results showed statistically significant lengthening of time to recurrence and overall survival rate when compared to those who did not take AHCC. Three participants in the AHCC group did not complete the trial due to nausea, but overall side effects were minimal. While the study implies a benefit for post surgical HCC treatment, the lack of randomization and placebo control tempers that result.
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