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How increased are my odds for another melanoma if I’ve already had one?

Forums Cutaneous Melanoma Community How increased are my odds for another melanoma if I’ve already had one?

  • Post
    mlbjab
    Participant

      Are my odds of another higher than for my siblings since I've already had one?  We have same skin type, same type of moles.  We have skin that tans, doesn't burn easily.  We do freckle and have multiple freckles but not that many moles.  I am a little confused as to how increased my odds are and how carefully I should be watching for a new one after my in situ diagnosis?

      Are my odds of another higher than for my siblings since I've already had one?  We have same skin type, same type of moles.  We have skin that tans, doesn't burn easily.  We do freckle and have multiple freckles but not that many moles.  I am a little confused as to how increased my odds are and how carefully I should be watching for a new one after my in situ diagnosis?

    Viewing 8 reply threads
    • Replies
        washoegal
        Participant

          From what I have read the probability of getting a second melanoma ranges from 4-8%.  The good news is it will likely be another very non-lethal one since I would assume you are having regular skin exams now.  Here is a very good article on the subject.

          http://archderm.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=477743

          Regarding your family, it is hard to say.  My mother had melanoma but the Onc says that is not enough family history and my tumor did not carry any marker that would indicate familiar melanoma.  I have lots of sun damage, and that's the bottom line for me.  It's been 2 years now for me so if this article is correct, I may not see a second primary.  But with my former love of the sun I'm not taking chances!

          I try not to worry about things I can't change.

          Mary

          Stage 3

            mlbjab
            Participant

              Okay, that is low odds.  That is same as survival for stage 1 melanoma.  So I have same odds of another primary as someone stage 1 has of dying.  And I do read on here stage 1 does not generally have risk of dying.  I will keep up annual exams from my doctor but won't change my lifestyle.

               

              mlbjab
              Participant

                Okay, that is low odds.  That is same as survival for stage 1 melanoma.  So I have same odds of another primary as someone stage 1 has of dying.  And I do read on here stage 1 does not generally have risk of dying.  I will keep up annual exams from my doctor but won't change my lifestyle.

                 

                mlbjab
                Participant

                  Okay, that is low odds.  That is same as survival for stage 1 melanoma.  So I have same odds of another primary as someone stage 1 has of dying.  And I do read on here stage 1 does not generally have risk of dying.  I will keep up annual exams from my doctor but won't change my lifestyle.

                   

                washoegal
                Participant

                  From what I have read the probability of getting a second melanoma ranges from 4-8%.  The good news is it will likely be another very non-lethal one since I would assume you are having regular skin exams now.  Here is a very good article on the subject.

                  http://archderm.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=477743

                  Regarding your family, it is hard to say.  My mother had melanoma but the Onc says that is not enough family history and my tumor did not carry any marker that would indicate familiar melanoma.  I have lots of sun damage, and that's the bottom line for me.  It's been 2 years now for me so if this article is correct, I may not see a second primary.  But with my former love of the sun I'm not taking chances!

                  I try not to worry about things I can't change.

                  Mary

                  Stage 3

                  washoegal
                  Participant

                    From what I have read the probability of getting a second melanoma ranges from 4-8%.  The good news is it will likely be another very non-lethal one since I would assume you are having regular skin exams now.  Here is a very good article on the subject.

                    http://archderm.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=477743

                    Regarding your family, it is hard to say.  My mother had melanoma but the Onc says that is not enough family history and my tumor did not carry any marker that would indicate familiar melanoma.  I have lots of sun damage, and that's the bottom line for me.  It's been 2 years now for me so if this article is correct, I may not see a second primary.  But with my former love of the sun I'm not taking chances!

                    I try not to worry about things I can't change.

                    Mary

                    Stage 3

                    Janner
                    Participant

                      Your odds of a second primary run in the 8-10% range depending on the source.  If you have a strong family history or if you have dysplastic nevus syndrome (lots of atypical moles), your risk is higher.  You are also at much higher risk for the other types of skin cancer now.  While they have a better survival rate, they can be disfiguring when removed.  If you are the only one in your family with melanoma, your kids would have a 2-3 times higher likelihood than the general population to get melanoma.  It's a little less clear with siblings, but if they share the same skin type and sun habits as you, their risk would probably be similar.  Changing your lifestyle is up to you, and it also depends on what you mean.  Being sun smart is probably a really good idea.  Any tan is basically skin damage.  Being "healthy" just makes sense, but diet/supplements/etc don't have much in the way of scientific study to say they'll decrease your risk of recurrence or a second primary.  Moderation is always a great mantra to consider.  Watch your moles for CHANGE and watch for that "ugly duckling" mole that stands out.

                      Janner
                      Participant

                        Your odds of a second primary run in the 8-10% range depending on the source.  If you have a strong family history or if you have dysplastic nevus syndrome (lots of atypical moles), your risk is higher.  You are also at much higher risk for the other types of skin cancer now.  While they have a better survival rate, they can be disfiguring when removed.  If you are the only one in your family with melanoma, your kids would have a 2-3 times higher likelihood than the general population to get melanoma.  It's a little less clear with siblings, but if they share the same skin type and sun habits as you, their risk would probably be similar.  Changing your lifestyle is up to you, and it also depends on what you mean.  Being sun smart is probably a really good idea.  Any tan is basically skin damage.  Being "healthy" just makes sense, but diet/supplements/etc don't have much in the way of scientific study to say they'll decrease your risk of recurrence or a second primary.  Moderation is always a great mantra to consider.  Watch your moles for CHANGE and watch for that "ugly duckling" mole that stands out.

                          mlbjab
                          Participant

                            So even if my kids never get sunburn and do not visit sunbeds they will still have 2-3 times higher risk? 

                            mlbjab
                            Participant

                              So even if my kids never get sunburn and do not visit sunbeds they will still have 2-3 times higher risk? 

                              mlbjab
                              Participant

                                So even if my kids never get sunburn and do not visit sunbeds they will still have 2-3 times higher risk? 

                                Webbie73
                                Participant
                                  Janner, do you have any statistics on if a person has had all of the above? Atypical nevi, SKs, AKs,melanoma and squamous cell carcinoma. Or any links?
                                  Webbie73
                                  Participant
                                    Janner, do you have any statistics on if a person has had all of the above? Atypical nevi, SKs, AKs,melanoma and squamous cell carcinoma. Or any links?
                                    Janner
                                    Participant

                                      No, I have no links for anything like that.  Most risks are "relative risks".  Say for instance you have red hair.  That has a relative risk of maybe 5% (don't remember actual figures).  You have a 5% higher risk than someone with black hair.  Say you have blue eyes.  That might have a 3% relative risk.  If you have red hair and blue eyes, your risk isn't 8%.  It isn't cummulative.  It's a relative risk only.  The same thing goes for having atypical nevi or AK's.  SK's are totally benign so not really in the equation.  BCC and SCC increase the risk as well.  But you can't make any assumptions that having all of these factors will make you much higher risk than someone who only has one or two factors.  Maybe, maybe not.  Each factor is independently evaluated against the general non-melanoma population and I haven't seen data where multiple factors are included to evaluate risk.

                                      Janner
                                      Participant

                                        No, I have no links for anything like that.  Most risks are "relative risks".  Say for instance you have red hair.  That has a relative risk of maybe 5% (don't remember actual figures).  You have a 5% higher risk than someone with black hair.  Say you have blue eyes.  That might have a 3% relative risk.  If you have red hair and blue eyes, your risk isn't 8%.  It isn't cummulative.  It's a relative risk only.  The same thing goes for having atypical nevi or AK's.  SK's are totally benign so not really in the equation.  BCC and SCC increase the risk as well.  But you can't make any assumptions that having all of these factors will make you much higher risk than someone who only has one or two factors.  Maybe, maybe not.  Each factor is independently evaluated against the general non-melanoma population and I haven't seen data where multiple factors are included to evaluate risk.

                                        washoegal
                                        Participant

                                          Janner, I have never read the 2-3 times higher risk for children if a parent has melanoma.  My Onc.  (Dr Hamid, Angeles Clinic) has pretty much discounted any connection between my mother having it and my having it.  Wondering if anyone has any back-up for this.  I know Janner usually has right on info. Just curious.

                                          Mary

                                          Stage 3

                                          washoegal
                                          Participant

                                            Janner, I have never read the 2-3 times higher risk for children if a parent has melanoma.  My Onc.  (Dr Hamid, Angeles Clinic) has pretty much discounted any connection between my mother having it and my having it.  Wondering if anyone has any back-up for this.  I know Janner usually has right on info. Just curious.

                                            Mary

                                            Stage 3

                                            Janner
                                            Participant

                                              I participated in a high risk familial melanoma study.  The institution I go to does a lot of genetic research – it's their focus.  These are the notes I took at the study and from the video they created:

                                              Risk Factors for Melanoma
                                              These are compared to the normal caucasian population who do not have melanoma.  
                                              These are relative risks, not cumulative.
                                              
                                              If several people in your family have melanoma:
                                              35-70 times greater risk to develop melanoma
                                              
                                              If you've had a previous Primary melanoma:
                                              8.5 times greater risk to develop melanoma
                                              
                                              If you have a family history of just 1 person in your family:
                                              2-3 times as likely to develop melanoma
                                              
                                              If you have Type I skin (always burns, never tans), freckles,
                                              blue eyes, red hair:
                                              7.4-10 times more likely to get melanoma
                                              
                                              If you've had one blistering sunburn:
                                              You are at 2 to 3 times greater risk than the average caucasian
                                              without blistering sunburn history.
                                              
                                              Many/Unusual Moles
                                              2 to 12 times greater chance of getting melanoma
                                              
                                              
                                              
                                              90% of melanomas are sporadic meaning their is no genetic defect.
                                              
                                              Other reasons why MM may cluster in families:
                                              Shared environment
                                              Shared sun exposure
                                              Normal features that are inherited
                                              
                                              Clues for an Inherited Risk of MM:
                                              Several family members with melanoma
                                              Melanoma in many generations
                                              Melanoma occuring at a younger than usual age
                                              One person with one or more melanoma primaries
                                              Many/Unusual looking moles
                                              The presence of certain other related types of cancer within the family
                                              
                                              NOT ALL families have all of these clues, but even having 1 or more
                                              of these clues in a family makes it more likely that there is an
                                              inherited risk for melanoma.
                                              
                                              P16 Gene Mutation:
                                              
                                              People born with the P16 mutation are thought to have an increased
                                              risk of melanoma.  75% chance of developing melanoma, small increased risk 
                                              of other related cancers.
                                              Janner
                                              Participant

                                                I participated in a high risk familial melanoma study.  The institution I go to does a lot of genetic research – it's their focus.  These are the notes I took at the study and from the video they created:

                                                Risk Factors for Melanoma
                                                These are compared to the normal caucasian population who do not have melanoma.  
                                                These are relative risks, not cumulative.
                                                
                                                If several people in your family have melanoma:
                                                35-70 times greater risk to develop melanoma
                                                
                                                If you've had a previous Primary melanoma:
                                                8.5 times greater risk to develop melanoma
                                                
                                                If you have a family history of just 1 person in your family:
                                                2-3 times as likely to develop melanoma
                                                
                                                If you have Type I skin (always burns, never tans), freckles,
                                                blue eyes, red hair:
                                                7.4-10 times more likely to get melanoma
                                                
                                                If you've had one blistering sunburn:
                                                You are at 2 to 3 times greater risk than the average caucasian
                                                without blistering sunburn history.
                                                
                                                Many/Unusual Moles
                                                2 to 12 times greater chance of getting melanoma
                                                
                                                
                                                
                                                90% of melanomas are sporadic meaning their is no genetic defect.
                                                
                                                Other reasons why MM may cluster in families:
                                                Shared environment
                                                Shared sun exposure
                                                Normal features that are inherited
                                                
                                                Clues for an Inherited Risk of MM:
                                                Several family members with melanoma
                                                Melanoma in many generations
                                                Melanoma occuring at a younger than usual age
                                                One person with one or more melanoma primaries
                                                Many/Unusual looking moles
                                                The presence of certain other related types of cancer within the family
                                                
                                                NOT ALL families have all of these clues, but even having 1 or more
                                                of these clues in a family makes it more likely that there is an
                                                inherited risk for melanoma.
                                                
                                                P16 Gene Mutation:
                                                
                                                People born with the P16 mutation are thought to have an increased
                                                risk of melanoma.  75% chance of developing melanoma, small increased risk 
                                                of other related cancers.
                                                Janner
                                                Participant

                                                  Sorry, my formatting got screwed up.  These were supposed to be bullet lists.  Oh well, the info is still there.

                                                  Janner
                                                  Participant

                                                    Sorry, my formatting got screwed up.  These were supposed to be bullet lists.  Oh well, the info is still there.

                                                    Janner
                                                    Participant

                                                      Sorry, my formatting got screwed up.  These were supposed to be bullet lists.  Oh well, the info is still there.

                                                      JC
                                                      Participant

                                                        The presence of certain other related types of cancer within the family . . . . what other related types of cancers?

                                                        JC
                                                        Participant

                                                          The presence of certain other related types of cancer within the family . . . . what other related types of cancers?

                                                          Janner
                                                          Participant

                                                            I don't remember the entire list (there were about 8 of them), but having pancreatic cancer and melanoma in one family were the two most stressed.  With the p16 genetic defect (realize this is only 2-4% of the melanoma population who have this defect), the risk of pancreatic cancer runs 11-17%.  Normal risk for just anyone is <1%.  So having both in one family raises red flags for the p16 genetic defect.

                                                            Janner
                                                            Participant

                                                              I don't remember the entire list (there were about 8 of them), but having pancreatic cancer and melanoma in one family were the two most stressed.  With the p16 genetic defect (realize this is only 2-4% of the melanoma population who have this defect), the risk of pancreatic cancer runs 11-17%.  Normal risk for just anyone is <1%.  So having both in one family raises red flags for the p16 genetic defect.

                                                              Janner
                                                              Participant

                                                                I don't remember the entire list (there were about 8 of them), but having pancreatic cancer and melanoma in one family were the two most stressed.  With the p16 genetic defect (realize this is only 2-4% of the melanoma population who have this defect), the risk of pancreatic cancer runs 11-17%.  Normal risk for just anyone is <1%.  So having both in one family raises red flags for the p16 genetic defect.

                                                                JC
                                                                Participant

                                                                  The presence of certain other related types of cancer within the family . . . . what other related types of cancers?

                                                                  LynnLuc
                                                                  Participant

                                                                    NO one in my family had cancer…ever…until my mom…she died at 45 with cervical cancer…then my son died at 16 with Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Sarcoma…my moms sister had breast cancer and is surviving. Then I have stage 4 melanoma and now my brother 3 years my senior just found out he has tonsil cancer…he goes back Tuesday to find out the specifics…I had blistering sun burns as a kid…easy enough because I do have red hair, freckles, fair skin and blue eyes…my brother and I have no kids with red hair but the grand kids… lol  most of them have the bright red hair blue eyes and fair complexion…I believe they are at an elevated risk….

                                                                    LynnLuc
                                                                    Participant

                                                                      NO one in my family had cancer…ever…until my mom…she died at 45 with cervical cancer…then my son died at 16 with Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Sarcoma…my moms sister had breast cancer and is surviving. Then I have stage 4 melanoma and now my brother 3 years my senior just found out he has tonsil cancer…he goes back Tuesday to find out the specifics…I had blistering sun burns as a kid…easy enough because I do have red hair, freckles, fair skin and blue eyes…my brother and I have no kids with red hair but the grand kids… lol  most of them have the bright red hair blue eyes and fair complexion…I believe they are at an elevated risk….

                                                                      LynnLuc
                                                                      Participant

                                                                        NO one in my family had cancer…ever…until my mom…she died at 45 with cervical cancer…then my son died at 16 with Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Sarcoma…my moms sister had breast cancer and is surviving. Then I have stage 4 melanoma and now my brother 3 years my senior just found out he has tonsil cancer…he goes back Tuesday to find out the specifics…I had blistering sun burns as a kid…easy enough because I do have red hair, freckles, fair skin and blue eyes…my brother and I have no kids with red hair but the grand kids… lol  most of them have the bright red hair blue eyes and fair complexion…I believe they are at an elevated risk….

                                                                        Janner
                                                                        Participant

                                                                          I participated in a high risk familial melanoma study.  The institution I go to does a lot of genetic research – it's their focus.  These are the notes I took at the study and from the video they created:

                                                                          Risk Factors for Melanoma
                                                                          These are compared to the normal caucasian population who do not have melanoma.  
                                                                          These are relative risks, not cumulative.
                                                                          
                                                                          If several people in your family have melanoma:
                                                                          35-70 times greater risk to develop melanoma
                                                                          
                                                                          If you've had a previous Primary melanoma:
                                                                          8.5 times greater risk to develop melanoma
                                                                          
                                                                          If you have a family history of just 1 person in your family:
                                                                          2-3 times as likely to develop melanoma
                                                                          
                                                                          If you have Type I skin (always burns, never tans), freckles,
                                                                          blue eyes, red hair:
                                                                          7.4-10 times more likely to get melanoma
                                                                          
                                                                          If you've had one blistering sunburn:
                                                                          You are at 2 to 3 times greater risk than the average caucasian
                                                                          without blistering sunburn history.
                                                                          
                                                                          Many/Unusual Moles
                                                                          2 to 12 times greater chance of getting melanoma
                                                                          
                                                                          
                                                                          
                                                                          90% of melanomas are sporadic meaning their is no genetic defect.
                                                                          
                                                                          Other reasons why MM may cluster in families:
                                                                          Shared environment
                                                                          Shared sun exposure
                                                                          Normal features that are inherited
                                                                          
                                                                          Clues for an Inherited Risk of MM:
                                                                          Several family members with melanoma
                                                                          Melanoma in many generations
                                                                          Melanoma occuring at a younger than usual age
                                                                          One person with one or more melanoma primaries
                                                                          Many/Unusual looking moles
                                                                          The presence of certain other related types of cancer within the family
                                                                          
                                                                          NOT ALL families have all of these clues, but even having 1 or more
                                                                          of these clues in a family makes it more likely that there is an
                                                                          inherited risk for melanoma.
                                                                          
                                                                          P16 Gene Mutation:
                                                                          
                                                                          People born with the P16 mutation are thought to have an increased
                                                                          risk of melanoma.  75% chance of developing melanoma, small increased risk 
                                                                          of other related cancers.
                                                                          Gene_S
                                                                          Participant

                                                                            Hi Mary,

                                                                            My husbands derm said that since he has melanoma that our children and his siblings should be checked often as they are at a higher risk.

                                                                            Judy

                                                                            Gene_S
                                                                            Participant

                                                                              Hi Mary,

                                                                              My husbands derm said that since he has melanoma that our children and his siblings should be checked often as they are at a higher risk.

                                                                              Judy

                                                                              Gene_S
                                                                              Participant

                                                                                Hi Mary,

                                                                                My husbands derm said that since he has melanoma that our children and his siblings should be checked often as they are at a higher risk.

                                                                                Judy

                                                                                washoegal
                                                                                Participant

                                                                                  Janner, I have never read the 2-3 times higher risk for children if a parent has melanoma.  My Onc.  (Dr Hamid, Angeles Clinic) has pretty much discounted any connection between my mother having it and my having it.  Wondering if anyone has any back-up for this.  I know Janner usually has right on info. Just curious.

                                                                                  Mary

                                                                                  Stage 3

                                                                                  Janner
                                                                                  Participant

                                                                                    No, I have no links for anything like that.  Most risks are "relative risks".  Say for instance you have red hair.  That has a relative risk of maybe 5% (don't remember actual figures).  You have a 5% higher risk than someone with black hair.  Say you have blue eyes.  That might have a 3% relative risk.  If you have red hair and blue eyes, your risk isn't 8%.  It isn't cummulative.  It's a relative risk only.  The same thing goes for having atypical nevi or AK's.  SK's are totally benign so not really in the equation.  BCC and SCC increase the risk as well.  But you can't make any assumptions that having all of these factors will make you much higher risk than someone who only has one or two factors.  Maybe, maybe not.  Each factor is independently evaluated against the general non-melanoma population and I haven't seen data where multiple factors are included to evaluate risk.

                                                                                    Webbie73
                                                                                    Participant
                                                                                      Janner, do you have any statistics on if a person has had all of the above? Atypical nevi, SKs, AKs,melanoma and squamous cell carcinoma. Or any links?
                                                                                    Janner
                                                                                    Participant

                                                                                      Your odds of a second primary run in the 8-10% range depending on the source.  If you have a strong family history or if you have dysplastic nevus syndrome (lots of atypical moles), your risk is higher.  You are also at much higher risk for the other types of skin cancer now.  While they have a better survival rate, they can be disfiguring when removed.  If you are the only one in your family with melanoma, your kids would have a 2-3 times higher likelihood than the general population to get melanoma.  It's a little less clear with siblings, but if they share the same skin type and sun habits as you, their risk would probably be similar.  Changing your lifestyle is up to you, and it also depends on what you mean.  Being sun smart is probably a really good idea.  Any tan is basically skin damage.  Being "healthy" just makes sense, but diet/supplements/etc don't have much in the way of scientific study to say they'll decrease your risk of recurrence or a second primary.  Moderation is always a great mantra to consider.  Watch your moles for CHANGE and watch for that "ugly duckling" mole that stands out.

                                                                                      Charlie S
                                                                                      Participant

                                                                                        How long is piece of string?  

                                                                                        What are the odds of your siblings winning the lottery because you did?

                                                                                        It is well advised to watch ones skin.  But no matter what, just because you did, does not mean any one else will..

                                                                                        Your odds are just as good as mine.  Neither one of us getting out of here alive.

                                                                                        Watch your skin for changes, but put this in your head that In Situ is melanoma zero…………….in other words, you do not have melanoma.

                                                                                        Consider it a friendly shot across the bow of your bathtub boat.  You do not have melanoma.  Yes, you may in the future, but it is unlikely, but you must be aware of the possibility.

                                                                                        No one here has a crystal ball that can portend the future.

                                                                                        Be smart, be safe, but please do not obsess because you DO NOT have Melanoma right now.

                                                                                         

                                                                                        Okay?

                                                                                        Charlie S

                                                                                        Charlie S
                                                                                        Participant

                                                                                          How long is piece of string?  

                                                                                          What are the odds of your siblings winning the lottery because you did?

                                                                                          It is well advised to watch ones skin.  But no matter what, just because you did, does not mean any one else will..

                                                                                          Your odds are just as good as mine.  Neither one of us getting out of here alive.

                                                                                          Watch your skin for changes, but put this in your head that In Situ is melanoma zero…………….in other words, you do not have melanoma.

                                                                                          Consider it a friendly shot across the bow of your bathtub boat.  You do not have melanoma.  Yes, you may in the future, but it is unlikely, but you must be aware of the possibility.

                                                                                          No one here has a crystal ball that can portend the future.

                                                                                          Be smart, be safe, but please do not obsess because you DO NOT have Melanoma right now.

                                                                                           

                                                                                          Okay?

                                                                                          Charlie S

                                                                                            JC
                                                                                            Participant

                                                                                              Is that only for in situ?  what about a thin 1a that was excised?  would you/could you say the same about that?

                                                                                              JC
                                                                                              Participant

                                                                                                Is that only for in situ?  what about a thin 1a that was excised?  would you/could you say the same about that?

                                                                                                JC
                                                                                                Participant

                                                                                                  Is that only for in situ?  what about a thin 1a that was excised?  would you/could you say the same about that?

                                                                                                  mlbjab
                                                                                                  Participant

                                                                                                    I am the orignial poster.  It seems other anonymous is posting in my thread.  i haven't asked all other questions.

                                                                                                    So you are saying in situ not real melanoma?  So are those who had only in situ melanoma only at risk for other in situs  maybe this is just how their moles are?  Maybe you can have lots of in situs which some say are just pathologically odd moles, but maybe it isn't really a cancer?

                                                                                                    mlbjab
                                                                                                    Participant

                                                                                                      I am the orignial poster.  It seems other anonymous is posting in my thread.  i haven't asked all other questions.

                                                                                                      So you are saying in situ not real melanoma?  So are those who had only in situ melanoma only at risk for other in situs  maybe this is just how their moles are?  Maybe you can have lots of in situs which some say are just pathologically odd moles, but maybe it isn't really a cancer?

                                                                                                      mlbjab
                                                                                                      Participant

                                                                                                        I am the orignial poster.  It seems other anonymous is posting in my thread.  i haven't asked all other questions.

                                                                                                        So you are saying in situ not real melanoma?  So are those who had only in situ melanoma only at risk for other in situs  maybe this is just how their moles are?  Maybe you can have lots of in situs which some say are just pathologically odd moles, but maybe it isn't really a cancer?

                                                                                                        Charlie S
                                                                                                        Participant

                                                                                                          Look, I didn't make the rules, but every seminar, webinar, symposium, every piece of medical literature, pathology reviews, demapathology reports is that In-Situ is Melanoma O————–that is Melanoma Zero.

                                                                                                          This has always been controversial, but I don't get it.  In-Situ is Melanoma Zero, so in my mind that means one does not have melanoma, and why this No Melanoma/Melanoma diagnosis even exists.  To me it is just an extension of pre-cancerous…………….which is kind of like being pre-pregnant…………..either you are or you are not.

                                                                                                          At a MRF sponsered symposium at the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill I heard a dermapath say very clearly that In-Situ is NOT melanoma.

                                                                                                          Again, I didn't make the rules, but this seems to be a labeling issue that ASCO should resolve, because as it is now, it instills unfounded fear, confusion, and offers no intelligent way forward for an informed and proactive patient.

                                                                                                          So yes, I am saying, according to my interpretation of the available science, In-Sit is NOT melanoma.

                                                                                                          For all the naysayers, rail at me all you want, but consider the scientific evidence.  In-Situ is NOT a diagnosis of Melanoma.as presently defined by those that define such things.

                                                                                                          This, in no way is an attempt to negate the fears of those with a In-Situ dx.  What I would sugest is you ask your doctor this question "Is this or is this not Melanoma?"

                                                                                                           

                                                                                                           

                                                                                                          And no, for the poster that inquired about 1-A, 1-A is a genuine Melanoma diagnosis, if the path supports it.

                                                                                                          Cheers,

                                                                                                          Charlie S

                                                                                                          Nicole78
                                                                                                          Participant

                                                                                                            Hi, I’ve been diagnosed with melanoma in Situ so that was the shock of my life πŸ™ I could only see the bad things in front πŸ™ I had the excision , on the back I had a dysplastic one and had that removed as well and waiting now for one on my nipples which I really hope to come back ok , I had enough already πŸ™ the amount of stress and anxiety is huge , you just can’t see ahead πŸ™ so I really hope the last one they found will be fine πŸ™ there is the fear that they will find another one, or that the melanoma will form inside the body and other things like these πŸ™ it’s so good to discuss about these problems and I’m so thankful for your support. Thank you 

                                                                                                            Charlie S
                                                                                                            Participant

                                                                                                              Look, I didn't make the rules, but every seminar, webinar, symposium, every piece of medical literature, pathology reviews, demapathology reports is that In-Situ is Melanoma O————–that is Melanoma Zero.

                                                                                                              This has always been controversial, but I don't get it.  In-Situ is Melanoma Zero, so in my mind that means one does not have melanoma, and why this No Melanoma/Melanoma diagnosis even exists.  To me it is just an extension of pre-cancerous…………….which is kind of like being pre-pregnant…………..either you are or you are not.

                                                                                                              At a MRF sponsered symposium at the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill I heard a dermapath say very clearly that In-Situ is NOT melanoma.

                                                                                                              Again, I didn't make the rules, but this seems to be a labeling issue that ASCO should resolve, because as it is now, it instills unfounded fear, confusion, and offers no intelligent way forward for an informed and proactive patient.

                                                                                                              So yes, I am saying, according to my interpretation of the available science, In-Sit is NOT melanoma.

                                                                                                              For all the naysayers, rail at me all you want, but consider the scientific evidence.  In-Situ is NOT a diagnosis of Melanoma.as presently defined by those that define such things.

                                                                                                              This, in no way is an attempt to negate the fears of those with a In-Situ dx.  What I would sugest is you ask your doctor this question "Is this or is this not Melanoma?"

                                                                                                               

                                                                                                               

                                                                                                              And no, for the poster that inquired about 1-A, 1-A is a genuine Melanoma diagnosis, if the path supports it.

                                                                                                              Cheers,

                                                                                                              Charlie S

                                                                                                              Charlie S
                                                                                                              Participant

                                                                                                                Look, I didn't make the rules, but every seminar, webinar, symposium, every piece of medical literature, pathology reviews, demapathology reports is that In-Situ is Melanoma O————–that is Melanoma Zero.

                                                                                                                This has always been controversial, but I don't get it.  In-Situ is Melanoma Zero, so in my mind that means one does not have melanoma, and why this No Melanoma/Melanoma diagnosis even exists.  To me it is just an extension of pre-cancerous…………….which is kind of like being pre-pregnant…………..either you are or you are not.

                                                                                                                At a MRF sponsered symposium at the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill I heard a dermapath say very clearly that In-Situ is NOT melanoma.

                                                                                                                Again, I didn't make the rules, but this seems to be a labeling issue that ASCO should resolve, because as it is now, it instills unfounded fear, confusion, and offers no intelligent way forward for an informed and proactive patient.

                                                                                                                So yes, I am saying, according to my interpretation of the available science, In-Sit is NOT melanoma.

                                                                                                                For all the naysayers, rail at me all you want, but consider the scientific evidence.  In-Situ is NOT a diagnosis of Melanoma.as presently defined by those that define such things.

                                                                                                                This, in no way is an attempt to negate the fears of those with a In-Situ dx.  What I would sugest is you ask your doctor this question "Is this or is this not Melanoma?"

                                                                                                                 

                                                                                                                 

                                                                                                                And no, for the poster that inquired about 1-A, 1-A is a genuine Melanoma diagnosis, if the path supports it.

                                                                                                                Cheers,

                                                                                                                Charlie S

                                                                                                              Charlie S
                                                                                                              Participant

                                                                                                                How long is piece of string?  

                                                                                                                What are the odds of your siblings winning the lottery because you did?

                                                                                                                It is well advised to watch ones skin.  But no matter what, just because you did, does not mean any one else will..

                                                                                                                Your odds are just as good as mine.  Neither one of us getting out of here alive.

                                                                                                                Watch your skin for changes, but put this in your head that In Situ is melanoma zero…………….in other words, you do not have melanoma.

                                                                                                                Consider it a friendly shot across the bow of your bathtub boat.  You do not have melanoma.  Yes, you may in the future, but it is unlikely, but you must be aware of the possibility.

                                                                                                                No one here has a crystal ball that can portend the future.

                                                                                                                Be smart, be safe, but please do not obsess because you DO NOT have Melanoma right now.

                                                                                                                 

                                                                                                                Okay?

                                                                                                                Charlie S

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